Say what?
July 10, 2014
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Donald Sterling is still fighting for ownership of the Los Angeles Clippers.

During his trial Wednesday, Sterling denounced his wife and her lawyers and vowed to sue the NBA.

"I will never, ever sell this team, and until I die I will be suing the NBA for this terrible violation under antitrust," Sterling said. Wednesday was the second day of testimony during the trial to determine Sterling's wife's right to sell the Clippers in a $2 billion deal with former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. Earlier this year, the NBA banned Donald Sterling for life and attempted to force him to sell the Clippers after he made racist statements.

When his wife, Shelly, approached him, Sterling called her a "pig" and shouted at her to stay away from him. During his testimony, Sterling said his wife had "deceived" him by subjecting him to psychiatric examinations.

"She has no rights whatsoever. She has no stock," Sterling said of his wife's involvement in the Sterling Family Trust, which owns the Clippers. "She has no standing whatsoever." Shelly Sterling, however, said at the trial that she is a 50 percent beneficiary of the trust.

Shelly Sterling's testimony resumes Thursday, and NBA owners are scheduled to vote on the deal with Ballmer on July 15. If the sale of the Clippers isn't completed by Sept. 15, the league may auction the team. Meghan DeMaria

election 2016
9:38 p.m. ET
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In a first for a Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton will personally cultivate donors for the top Democratic super PAC, Priorities USA Action.

The goal is to raise as much as $200 to $300 million this election, The New York Times reports. As a declared candidate, Clinton cannot ask donors for more than $50,000 for the super PAC, but under Federal Election Commission rules, she can attend events and talk to the audience, as long as appeals for large amounts of money take place when she is not in the room. Harold M. Ickes, a longtime adviser for Clinton, is starting to become more involved with the super PAC, and a Clinton loyalist, Guy Cecil, will help oversee it.

One campaign official, who spoke to the Times on condition of anonymity, said that Clinton will do what she can to help Priorities. "With some Republican candidates reportedly setting up and outsourcing their entire campaign to super PACs and the Koch brothers pledging $1 billion alone for the 2016 campaign, Democrats have to have the resources to fight back," they said. "There is too much at stake for our future for Democrats to unilaterally disarm." Catherine Garcia

rebuilding baltimore
8:38 p.m. ET
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CVS will rebuild its stores in Baltimore that were looted and burned last week, and said it also plans to donate $100,000 to the United Way of Central Maryland's "Maryland Unites Fund" and the Baltimore Community Foundation's "Fund for Rebuilding Baltimore."

There are almost 30 CVS stores in Baltimore that employ more than 500 people, The Baltimore Sun reports, and the two stores that were damaged were built in the 1990s. "Our purpose as a company is helping people on their path to better health," CVS Health President and CEO Larry Merlo said on Wednesday. "There is no better way that we can fulfill that purpose than to reopen our doors and get back to serving the community." There is no timeline for reopening yet, company officials said, and employees at the affected stores have been offered worked at other CVS locations. Catherine Garcia

most wanted
8:07 p.m. ET

Four Islamic State leaders are now listed on the U.S. Department of State's Rewards for Justice list, which offers a collective $20 million in rewards for information that leads to the arrests of the men.

The State Department is offering $5 million for information on ISIS spokesman Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, $5 million for battlefield commander Tarkhan Tayumurazovich Batirashvili, $7 million for senior official Abdul Rahman Mustafa al-Qaduli, and up to $3 million for Tariq bin al-Tahar bin al-Falih al-Awni al-Harzi, the BBC reports.

Al-Adnani was born in Syria in 1977, and has appeared in numerous official videos released by ISIS. Batirashvili, also known as Omar Shishani ("Chechen" in Arabic), is based in northern Syria. He was born in 1986 in Birkiani, Georgia, and once led an organization affiliated with al-Qaeda and made up primarily of foreign fighters from the North Caucasus. Al-Qaduli was born in Mosul, Iraq, in the 1950s, and is believed to have taken control of ISIS while leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi recovered from an injury sustained in an airstrike. Al-Harzi was born in Tunis in 1982, and is based in Syria, where he recruits foreign fighters and is "emir of suicide bombers." Catherine Garcia

Pay up
6:50 p.m. ET
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Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) learned a $100,000 lesson: If you're in the public eye — especially as a politician running for president — you need to snag every single .com, .org, .whatever associated with your name.

In March, a month before Paul formally announced he was running for the Republican presidential nomination, his Senate re-election campaign paid $100,000 to a third-party firm for the domain randpaul.com, the Los Angeles Times reports. While the site at one time was run by supporters of Paul, no one is sure who owned it at the time of the hefty payment. Two of Paul's GOP comrades made the same mistake of not securing their own domains, and they are now dealing with some online embarrassment: carlyfiorina.org shows 30,000 sad faces, representing the number of people laid off at Hewlett Packard while Carly Fiorina was chief executive, while tedcruz.com sports the decidedly non-Ted Cruz message "Support President Obama. Immigration reform now!" Catherine Garcia

This just in
4:40 p.m. ET
Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Wednesday struck an 11th-hour deal to form a new coalition government, barely beating a midnight deadline to do so.

Nearly two months after winning re-election to a fourth term, Netanyahu announced around 11 p.m. he had cobbled together at least the 61 seats necessary in parliament to form a new government after securing the support of the nationalist Jewish Home party. "Israel now has a government," Naftali Bennett, Jewish Home's leader, said after meeting with members of Netanyahu's ruling Likud party.

Netanyahu came from behind to win a tight election in March, and the thin margin of victory complicated the process of forming a new government. Jon Terbush

From prom dates to court dates
4:21 p.m. ET

What ever happened to a nice bouquet of flowers?

The Idaho Statesman reports that one Idaho teen went much, much bigger with his or her elaborate "promposal." Unfortunately for the budding graffiti artist, spray-painting, "DESTINY, PROM?" in huge pink-and-blue letters across the state's Black Cliffs is illegal.

(Patrick Orr/Ada County Sheriff's Office via AP)

"We realize prom proposals are a big deal these days, but this one was just a really bad — and illegal — idea, which caused some serious aesthetic and cultural damage," the Ada County Sheriff's Office posted on its Facebook page.

If caught, the person responsible could face a misdemeanor charge that carries with it up to $1,000 in fines and possible jail time. Probably not the kind of date with destiny our would-be Prom Hero had in mind. Sarah Eberspacher

Austerity in action
3:57 p.m. ET

The skyrocketing price of college tuition at previously affordable state colleges and universities is a longstanding source of concern, especially for people graduating with mountains of student debt. People have many theories as to why this is happening: administrative bloat, too-high salaries for professors, or perhaps too many unnecessary new buildings.

Robert Hiltonsmith, an analyst at Demos, has crunched the numbers. While the above factors do play a small part, the overwhelming reason for increasing prices at state schools is decreasing support from state governments. Here's the take-home chart:

In other words, it's the austerity, stupid. Ryan Cooper

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