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June 23, 2014
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Starting tomorrow, your caffeine fix will be more expensive.

Starbucks confirmed Friday that it plans to raise prices on its packaged and roast coffee, including brewed coffee in stores. The new prices for brewed Starbucks drinks will go into effect Tuesday.

Fortune reports that brewed coffee prices will rise by 10 to 15 cents for grande and venti sizes, while tall cup prices, as well as venti latte prices, will rise an average of 15 to 20 cents. Specialty items such as the Frappuccino, however, won't see price increases.

The price of Starbucks' ground coffee in grocery stores and other retailers was increased Saturday by an average of eight percent. While many coffee companies have raised prices this year to offset Brazil's drought, Starbucks spokesperson Zack Hutson said energy and labor costs are also behind the move. Meghan DeMaria

10:48 a.m. ET
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In September, President Obama directed his administration to vet and admit 10,000 Syrian refugees to the United States over the course of a year. Now, eight months later, just 2,500 have made it to America, a pace which makes it unlikely that Obama's goal will be realized on time.

Combined with the White House's program of accelerated deportations of undocumented Central American immigrants, this slow approach to refugee admissions has brought the administration under criticism for its migrant policy more broadly, especially within the Democratic Party. "The world notices when we talk a good game but then we don’t follow through in our own backyard," said Kevin Appleby of the Center for Migration Studies to the New York Times.

Obama himself has expressed frustration at the delay in refugee processing, and Amy Pope of the Department of Homeland Security suggested to the Times that blame should be placed on the "dynamics within Congress." Bonnie Kristian

10:15 a.m. ET
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If someone told California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) back in 1992 that he'd someday endorse Hillary Clinton for president, he likely wouldn't have believed it. As evidenced by this video of Bill Clinton and Brown debating each other during the 1992 Democratic presidential primary, Brown and the Clintons used to really, really dislike each other:

Back then, Brown criticized the Clintons for allegedly funneling public money into Hillary's law firm and said that Bill put his corporate loyalties ahead of environmental safety. Bill wasn't much friendlier. He hit Brown right back, accusing him of reinventing himself "every year or two" and being nothing more than somebody's "mouthpiece."

The threat of a Donald Trump presidency, however, has proved enough for the former combatants to bury the hatchet. On Tuesday, Brown endorsed Hillary ahead of California's state primary on June 7. With Trump as the presumptive Republican nominee, Brown wrote in an open letter Tuesday, "this is no time for Democrats to keep fighting each other." Becca Stanek

9:47 a.m. ET
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California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) announced Tuesday that he will support Hillary Clinton in the state's upcoming primary on June 7. Though Brown admitted in an open letter to Democrats and independents that he is "deeply impressed with how well Bernie Sanders has done," he wrote that he thinks the "only path forward to win the presidency and stop the dangerous candidacy of Donald Trump" is to vote for Clinton.

Brown's endorsement comes in spite his rocky history with the Clintons, dating back to his 1992 presidential run against Bill Clinton. While he once slammed the Clintons for "corruption," in his open letter Tuesday, Brown commended Hillary Clinton for having "convincingly made the case she knows how to get things done" and having "the tenacity and skill to advance the Democratic agenda."

"The stakes couldn't be higher," Brown wrote of the upcoming general election. "Our country faces an existential threat from climate change and the spread of nuclear weapons. A new cold war is on the horizon. This is no time for Democrats to keep fighting each other." Becca Stanek

9:01 a.m. ET
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If Americans don't pick Donald Trump as the nation's 45th president, they'd better have their life jackets handy, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson warned on Fox & Friends Monday. Unless Republicans rally around their presumptive nominee, Carson said, the country is headed straight off of a 167-foot-high waterfall. "America, right now, is like a cruise ship that is about to go off of Niagara Falls with tremendous carnage and death," Carson said. "What you have to do first is recognize the problem, stop the ship, turn it around, and then move in the other direction."

Anyone considering a third-party run, Carson warned, needs to give it up and back Trump. "A quarter of a century ago, another Clinton was running for the White House and it was the entrance of a third-party candidate, Ross Perot, that made it possible for him to win," Carson said. "Now, wouldn't it be ironic if the same thing happened this time? Wouldn't we be smart to learn from things that have happened in the past?"

Watch Carson's full warning, below. Becca Stanek

8:33 a.m. ET

Three Texas road signs were hacked during weekend construction to inform Tuesday morning commuters that "work is canceled — go back home" and "Donald Trump is a shape-shifting lizard." The third sign said more simply, "Bernie for President," NBC reports.

The signs were turned off by TxDOT shortly before 6 a.m., but not before word got out:

Stay woke. Jeva Lange

8:19 a.m. ET
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North Korea is pretty keen on the idea of a Donald Trump presidency. So much so that North Korean state media DPRK Today published an editorial recently singing the presumptive GOP nominee's praises. Trump, DPRK Today says, is a "wise politician" and a "far-sighted candidate." "There are many positive aspects to Trump's 'inflammatory policies,'" Han Yong-mook, a Chinese North Korean scholar, wrote in the editorial. "Trump said he will not get involved in the war between the South and the North, isn't this fortunate from North Korea's perspective?"

The editorial also welcomed Trump's request to hold direct talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. "The president that U.S. citizens must vote for is not that dull Hillary — who claimed to adapt the Iranian model to resolve nuclear issues on the Korean Peninsula — but Trump, who spoke of holding direct conversation with North Korea," the editorial said.

While this isn't necessarily Pyongyang talking, The Guardian reports that experts contend the editorial is still likely reflective of the regime's take on Trump. "[Trump]'s the Dennis Rodman of American politics — quirky, flamboyant, risk-taking," John Feffer, director of Foreign Policy in Focus, said. "At the moment he's also an outsider. But Pyongyang is hoping that either he'll be elected [and follow through on his pledges] or that his pronouncements will change the political game in the U.S. and influence how the Democratic Party and mainstream Republicans view Korean issues." Becca Stanek

8:07 a.m. ET
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The Global Slavery Index reported their annual findings on Tuesday, putting the total number of enslaved people around the world at an estimated 45.8 million, up from an estimated 35.8 million in 2014. Fifty-eight percent of those living in slavery are in India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or Uzbekistan, the report found. Proportionally, North Korea, Uzbekistan, Cambodia, India, and Qatar have the highest populations of people in modern slavery, with one in every 20 people in North Korea being a slave.

"In North Korea, there is pervasive evidence that government-sanctioned forced labor occurs in an extensive system of prison labor camps while North Korean women are subjected to forced marriage and commercial sexual exploitation in China and other neighboring states. In Uzbekistan, the government continues to subject its citizens to forced labor in the annual cotton harvest," the report said.

The United States and Canada have among the lowest estimated prevalence of modern slavery by proportion to their population, along with the Luxembourg, Ireland, Norway, and Denmark. However, instances of slavery were found in all 167 countries included in the index, which was informed by 42,000 interviews by Gallup in 53 languages and across 25 countries.

"We need to make it clear we're not going to tolerate slavery and when there is slavery in a regime we should not trade with them," the foundation's founder, Andrew Forrest, told CNBC. "This is not AIDS or malaria. We have caused slavery and because it's a human condition we can fix it." Jeva Lange

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