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May 14, 2014
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On Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that people most at risk for contracting HIV take a daily pill that has been shown to prevent being infected by the virus.

The CDC's new guidelines state that the drug regimen pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) should be used by gay men who have sex without condoms, anyone who shares needles or injects drugs, heterosexuals with high-risk partners (such as male bisexuals or an intravenous drug user) who have unprotected sex, and people who regularly have sex with partners who are infected, The New York Times reports. The drug Truvada — a mix of tenofovir and emtricitabine that has few side effects and is already used to treat patients in poor countries — costs $13,000 a year and is covered by most health insurers.

"On average, it takes a decade for a scientific breakthrough to be adopted," Dr. Jonathan Mermin, director of the CDC's national center for AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, told The Times. "We hope we can shorten that time frame and increase people's survival."

With condom use down among gay men and the HIV infection rate in the U.S. barely changing in a decade, the CDC felt action was necessary. While the regimen should be used along with condoms, many health officials believe people who take Truvada will stop using them. If broadly followed, The Times reports, the drugs will be prescribed to 500,000 people a year, up from fewer than 10,000 now. Catherine Garcia

7:47 p.m. ET

The New Jersey medical examiner has identified the victim in Thursday morning's train crash in Hoboken as Fabiola Bittar de Kroon, 34.

De Kroon was a resident of Hoboken and native of Brazil, who once worked as a lawyer there at the computer software company SAP, NBC New York reports. She recently moved to Hoboken with her family, and her young daughter was in day care at the time of the accident, which left at least 114 people injured. Officials said de Kroon was waiting on a platform when the New Jersey Transit train came careening into the terminal, and she was hit by falling debris. Catherine Garcia

7:16 p.m. ET
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton says a Newsweek story about Donald Trump allegedly violating the U.S. trade embargo against Cuba shows he's "puts his personal and business interests ahead of the laws and values and policies of the United States of America."

While investigating the story, published Thursday, Newsweek interviewed former executives of Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts and looked at court filings and company records. They found that in 1998, Trump wanted to get into the Cuban market, and sent a consulting firm to Havana on its behalf to find any business opportunities. The company allegedly spent at least $68,000 in Cuba, without U.S. permission, and Newsweek says they made it appear as though the trip was connected to a Catholic charity. In 1999, Trump wrote in a Miami Herald column that he refused to do business in Cuba because "it would place me directly at odds with the longstanding U.S. policy of isolating Fidel Castro. I had a choice to make: huge profits or human rights. For me, it was a no-brainer."

Trump's campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, said on Thursday the money was never paid, giving the only statement so far from the Trump camp, the BBC reports. The Cuban-American vote in Florida is huge, and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who has endorsed Trump, told an ESPN/ABC podcast he hopes "the Trump campaign is going to come forward and answer some questions about this, because if what the article says is true — and I'm not saying that it is, we don't know with 100 percent certainty — I'd be deeply concerned about it." Catherine Garcia

5:40 p.m. ET

A New Jersey Transit commuter train crashed Thursday morning at a station in Hoboken, New Jersey. At least 114 people were injured, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) told CNN on Thursday afternoon, with many in critical condition. At least one person is confirmed dead.

"I got off my train on the way into work and as I was walking through the station, we could see that a train had come through the place where it's supposed to stop, all the way into the station — not into the waiting room but into the outdoor part," said Nancy Solomon of New York radio station WNYC. Photographs of the crash show significant damage to the station, including a partial collapse of the roof.

The crash happened at the height of the morning commute, around 8:45 a.m., though the number and severity of injuries is still unclear. Preliminary investigation suggests the incident was either accidental or caused by operator error. Full service is expected to resume for evening rush hour.

This post has been updated throughout. Jeva Lange

4:51 p.m. ET

There's a reason he won all those Tonys.

Sure, Broadway star Lin-Manuel Miranda can make theater sensations out of America's founding history or a dynamic three-day stint in a bustling New York City neighborhood — but that's kid stuff. No, the real talent comes out when you're tasked with making musical magic out of a single stump speech sentence:

Miranda is one of GQ's October 2016 cover men, and you can read the magazine's profile of him here. Kimberly Alters

2:39 p.m. ET
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Hillary Clinton held an early voting campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, on Thursday, focusing on her lifelong fight "for kids and families," which she said would be "the mission of my presidency."

Clinton and other Democrats are hoping to encourage voters to cast ballots early for fear that a lack of enthusiasm this election cycle could lead to lower voter turnout than occurred for President Obama's election, The Associated Press reports. Four in 10 Iowans voted early in 2012, and this year Democrats hope that number will be even higher, as more Republicans tend to turn up for the polls in November.

While early voting is now open in a handful of states, Iowa is the first battleground state to open voting. At this time, Donald Trump leads the state in the RealClearPolitics average, with 43 percent to Clinton's 38 percent in a four-way race. Jeva Lange

2:19 p.m. ET
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America's millionaire class is expanding rapidly. In just five years, the number of households whose investable assets totaled more than $1 million jumped 41.5 percent, from 4,797,879 millionaires in 2010 to 6,789,666 millionaires in 2015. Moreover, the growth spreads out across every level of the wealth pyramid, Barron's reports. For example, the number of households that crossed the $20 million mark soared a remarkable 64 percent in that time frame. And in a historical first, more than 1 million Americans can be considered penta millionaires, meaning their assets surpass $5 million total. Kelly Gonsalves

12:33 p.m. ET

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf appeared before Congress on Thursday, for the second time since news broke that his bank opened up 2 million fake accounts without informing its customers. Stumpf faced the Senate Banking Committee last week, where he incurred the wrath of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who demanded he resign.

At Thursday's hearing before the House Financial Services Committee, Stumpf continued to face outrage from Democrats and Republicans alike, with Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.) accusing Stumpf of running "a criminal enterprise":

Stumpf stressed he would cooperate with lawmakers: "I am fully accountable for all unethical sales practices in our retail banking business, and I am fully committed to fixing this issue," he said. "We will not stop working until we get this right." Jeva Lange

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