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Mother's Day
May 11, 2014
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Mother's Day as we celebrate it today is filled with flowers, presents, and elaborate brunches. But when it was founded 100 years ago, it was supposed to be a day of reflection, not buying things.

As National Geographic reports, in 1908, Anna Jarvis was spurred to action by the death of her mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, a women's group organizer. She decided to start the first Mother's Day observances in West Virginia, Philadelphia, and other locations. Word spread across the United States, and as more and more cities began to celebrate, President Woodrow Wilson set the second Sunday in May aside for Mother's Day.

Jarvis stressed that the day was "Mother's Day," not "Mothers' Day," because "it wasn't to celebrate all mothers," explains Katharine Antolini of West Virginia Wesleyan College. "It was to celebrate the best mother you've ever known — your mother — as a son or a daughter." It didn't take long for the commercialization to happen, and Jarvis was upset by the holiday shifting toward material objects instead of sincere affection. She used her inheritance to fight against the new way of celebrating, even crashing a confectioners conference and organizing boycotts.

It was to no avail. Jarvis died in 1948 at the age of 84 in Philadelphia's Marshall Square Sanitarium, not really having changed anything. "This woman, who died penniless in a sanitarium in a state of dementia, was a woman who could have profited from Mother's Day if she wanted to," Antolini says. "But she railed against those who did, and it cost her everything, financially and physically." Now, try not to feel guilty as you finish that box of chocolates. Catherine Garcia

Better late than never
10:53 a.m. ET
Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

Amsterdam will repay families of Jewish people fined for late rent payments while they were held in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, city officials announced Friday. The average reimbursement would be 1,800 euros, or about $2,000, Agence France Presse reports.

Only 18,000 of the 80,000 Jewish people from Amsterdam sent to concentration camps survived. The Dutch Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide reported 240 Holocaust survivors were made to pay late fees upon returning to the Dutch capital.

AFP found that though complaints over the finds have renewed in recent years, there was controversy as early as 1946, when carpenter and businessman J.W. Levending wrote to local authorities: "Is it for us to pay for the broken pots? Those who during the past years have lived in misery, locked away, and from whom the Germans took everything?" Julie Kliegman

Ouch
10:23 a.m. ET
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

An August pillow fight at the United States Military Academy, an annual tradition among freshmen, turned violent, The New York Times reported Friday. The West Point, New York, institution confirmed the Aug. 20 incident to the Times on Thursday after social media rumors of injuries circulated.

"My plebe [West Point's term for freshman] was knocked unconscious and immediately began fighting when he came to," an unnamed upperclassman wrote on Yik Yak. "I was so proud I could cry."

Some cadets reportedly packed helmets and other hard objects into their pillow cases. The academy said 30 cadets were injured, 24 with concussions. One freshman was knocked unconscious, and others suffered broken bones and dislocated shoulders.

"If you don’t come back with a bloody nose, you didn't try hard enough," one upperclassman commander reportedly told a freshman cadet.

No cadets have been punished so far, but there is an ongoing investigation. West Point called off the annual tradition in 2013 after a cadet injured others with a lockbox in a pillowcase during the 2012 event. A 1901 congressional inquiry on hazing shows the tradition dates back to at least 1897. Julie Kliegman

fault
8:24 a.m. ET
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

No. 8 Rafael Nadal bowed out of the U.S Open early after falling in a grueling five-set match Friday night. The Spanish star led No. 32 Fabio Fognini of Italy after two sets at Arthur Ashe Stadium, but after nearly four hours, he was ousted 3-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.

The third-round loss breaks Nadal's 10-year streak of winning at least one Grand Slam title. "The only thing it means is I played amazing the last 10 years," he said.

Fognini called his hard-earned upset a "mental victory."

"That was one of greatest, most spectacular comebacks you're ever going to see on a tennis court," tennis legend John McEnroe said. "The level that he played to mount that miraculous comeback will be remembered for a long time." Julie Kliegman

European migrant crisis
7:52 a.m. ET

About 4,000 migrants, many fleeing war in Syria, arrived in Austria early Saturday, where they were greeted by applause, food, and medical supplies. Many refugees, who Hungary agreed to bus, will request asylum in Austria, while others will continue on to Germany, BBC News reports.

Europe's ongoing migrant crisis has seen renewed attention in September after graphic photos emerged of a Syrian toddler's body washed up on a Turkish beach. The United Nations called on the European Union to help migrants Friday, one day after Hungary had forced migrants off of the nation's trains. Many of the migrants, including young children, had walked along Hungary's train tracks for hours toward Austria before boarding buses.

Officials say about 6,000 migrants still in Hungary are expected to reach Austria, CNN reports. Julie Kliegman

This just in
September 4, 2015
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Jailed Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis will reportedly appeal her contempt of court ruling and has no plans to resign as Rowan County clerk, her lawyer said Friday. Davis, who was sent to jail Thursday after a judge found her in contempt of court for defying the Supreme Court's order to issue same-sex marriage licenses, says she has a "clean conscience."

Though a deputy clerk began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples in Davis' absence Friday, her attorney asserted that the licenses are void because she didn't authorize them. Samantha Rollins

Only in America
September 4, 2015
Facebook.com/Washington State University

Washington State University professors have warned students that using "oppressive and hateful language" such as "male," "female," and "illegal immigrant" will result in bad grades. But administrators promised to ensure that no student will be punished for "using terms that may be deemed offensive to some." The Week Staff

emailgate
September 4, 2015
Win McNamee/Getty Images

In a Friday interview with NBC News' Andrea Mitchell, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton once again refused to apologize for using a private email server during her tenure as secretary of state. "I'm sorry this has been confusing to people and has raised a lot of questions," Clinton said.

While she admitted a personal server "wasn't the best choice," she maintained that she never knowingly broke the law. "This was fully above board, people knew I was using a personal email, I did it for convenience," Clinton said. "I sent emails that I thought were work related to people's dot gov accounts."

Watch the full interview over at NBC News. Becca Stanek

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