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March 25, 2014
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Half a decade after their erstwhile boss pleaded guilty to running a Ponzi scheme, five of Bernard Madoff's former aides were convicted on Monday of helping him cover it up. After a five-month trial, portfolio managers Annette Bongiorno and Joann Crupi, computer programmers Jerome O'Hara and George Perez, and back-office director Daniel Bonventre were all found guilty of securities fraud and conspiracy to defraud clients. "The scheme these defendants helped perpetrate cost innumerable investors their life savings," U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement. "Now it likely will cost the defendants their freedom." Sentencing will take place in July. Catherine Garcia

9:02 p.m. ET
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President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell won't be bonding over a shared belief in fake news.

Trump often talks about his dislike of most media, Fox News being the main exception, tweeting on Monday morning that the "very dishonest Fake News Media is out of control!" and telling the "Fake News" it should listen to Liberty University's Jerry Falwell, who was "fantastic on Fox and Friends."

McConnell has a different outlook. Later Monday, he revealed during a Q&A with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin at the Louisville Chamber of Commerce that his "view is that most news is not fake, but I do try to look at a variety of sources." McConnell was asked which publications he reads, and shared that he reads articles from different outlets for balance. "I try not to fall in love with any particular source," he said. Catherine Garcia

8:14 p.m. ET
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A 63-year-old woman with terminal ovarian cancer was awarded $417 million Monday after a jury in Los Angeles found Johnson & Johnson liable for not warning her about the risk of using the company's talcum products.

Eva Echeverria's lawsuit is one of 4,500 in the United States, which allege that Johnson & Johnson disregarded studies that link its baby powder and Shower to Shower products with ovarian cancer. The jury awarded her $347 in punitive damages and $70 million in compensatory damages, and found there was a connection between her cancer and the powder. Echeverria was diagnosed in 2007, and said she started using Johnson & Johnson's baby powder at age 11, and didn't stop until 2016; Echeverria testified she would have quit much sooner had she known about the link.

Her lawsuit cited a 1982 study that showed woman who put talc on their genitals had a 92 percent increased risk for ovarian cancer, with the head researcher telling Johnson & Johnson it should put warning labels on its products, the Los Angeles Times reports. Johnson & Johnson, which said it plans on appealing the verdict, cited a different study from 2000, where researchers stated there was "no overall association" between talc use and epithelial ovarian cancer, but there was a "modest elevation in risk" for the type of cancer Echeverria has — serious ovarian cancer. She was not in the courthouse when the jury made its ruling, her attorney said, because she was too ill to attend. Catherine Garcia

6:57 p.m. ET
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A new ABC News/Washington Post poll finds in the wake of the deadly Charlottesville white supremacist rally, 37 percent of Americans approve of President Trump's job performance while 58 percent disapprove.

When it comes to how he responded to the incident in Charlottesville, just 28 percent approve compared to 56 percent who do not. The poll also found that nine percent of respondents, the equivalent of 22 million Americans, believe it is acceptable to hold white supremacist or neo-Nazi views, and 10 percent support the alt-right movement, while 50 percent oppose it. The poll, a random sample of 1,014 adults, was conducted August 16-20 in English and Spanish, on landlines and cell phones. The margin of sampling error is 3.5 points. Catherine Garcia

3:59 p.m. ET

To everyone who missed Monday's total eclipse: Don't worry, you've got another shot at seeing one on April 8, 2024. In exactly 6 years, 7 months, and 18 days, the moon will once again eclipse the sun.

While Monday's eclipse spanned from Oregon to South Carolina, the 2024 eclipse will be visible from Mexico up to Canada, crossing the paths of American cities including Dallas, Indianapolis, and Cleveland. Take a look at the map below, and start planning for 2024. Becca Stanek

3:33 p.m. ET

On Monday, President Trump stared directly at the sun during the solar eclipse and proceeded to give the moon a big thumbs up. As Trump snuck a peek sans glasses, defying common sense and the advice of scientists, a bystander reportedly shouted: "Don't look."

The president watched the rare event from the White House's Truman Balcony. He was joined by first lady Melania Trump and their 11-year-old son Barron, neither of whom appeared to look directly at the sun without the necessary protective eyewear, which is intended to prevent permanent eye damage.

Watch Trump watch the eclipse below. Becca Stanek

3:00 p.m. ET

On Monday afternoon, portions of the United States fell dark as the moon eclipsed the sun. For those who missed the rare coast-to-coast event — or for those who simply want to relive its spectacular beauty — check out some photos and videos of the total solar eclipse below. Becca Stanek

1:39 p.m. ET
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Spanish police confirmed Monday that they shot and killed 22-year-old Younes Abouyaaquob, the man suspected to have driven the van down Barcelona's La Rambla on Thursday in a terrorist attack that killed 13 people in the city center. Police shot Abouyaaquob in the outskirts of Subirats, a region west of Barcelona, after an extensive manhunt took place over the weekend. He was apparently wearing a fake suicide belt.

Abouyaaquob escaped from Thursday's crash scene on foot and was believed to be the last remaining member of a wider terrorist cell suspected of planning last week's attacks in Barcelona and the coastal city of Cambrils, where another vehicle attack killed one and injured six. Kimberly Alters

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