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February 23, 2016
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The Earth is exiting a long period of stable ocean and climate levels during which human civilization grew and flourished, and it's almost certainly due to human activity, scientists in the U.S. and Germany said in a pair of papers published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. One study, led by Rutgers climate scientist Robert Kopp, mapped out changes in sea levels around the globe over the past 2,800 years; oceans rose or fell no more than 1.5 inches a century from ancient Rome's founding until the Industrial Age in the 1800s, the study found, but rose 5.5 inches in the 20th century alone, accelerating to a rate of 12 inches a century by 1993.

The researchers blamed the increasing sea levels on rising global temperatures they and almost all other scientists attribute to the burning of fossil fuels. "Physics tells us that sea-level change and temperature change should go hand-in-hand," Kopp said. "This new geological record confirms it." Kopp and his team estimate that sea levels will rise 22 to 52 inches by 2100 at the current rate, or 11 to 22 inches if nations fully enact the global climate change treaty negotiated in Paris last year.

The second paper, led by Matthias Mengel of Germany's Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, similarly estimated that sea levels will rise three to four feet by 2100 if humans don't curb carbon emissions — roughly the same range predicted in 2013 by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Both papers acknowledged that there were significant unknowns in their analyses, but not in a way that should make humanity in general and coastal dwellers in particular feel any safer: If the massive ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica melt, as seems likely, most bets are off.

If that seems distant and theoretical, a third, unpublished study released Monday found that rising temperatures are responsible for a sharp increase in "nuisance floods" in seaside towns along the southern U.S. East Coast over the past 50 years, causing millions of dollars of damage due to incursions of a few feet of saltwater. Most of those floods wouldn't have happened without manmade global warming, the team, from Climate Central, reported. "I think we need a new way to think about most coastal flooding," said lead author Benjamin Strauss. "It's not the tide. It's not the wind. It's us. That's true for most of the coastal floods we now experience." Peter Weber

December 10, 2016
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President-elect Donald Trump is expected to tap ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, with whom Trump met twice this week, for secretary of state. John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, will be deputy secretary of state, a source told NBC News.

Tillerson has been president of ExxonMobil for 12 years after spending his entire career at the company, during which time he developed what The Wall Street Journal calls "close ties" with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Tillerson has a reputation as a strong supporter of free trade, a potential source of conflict with Trump, but less is known of his foreign policy perspective beyond his critique of sanctions as ineffective.

The pick has not been confirmed by the Trump camp. Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016
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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Saturday he hopes Russia and the Bashar al-Assad regime will take the high road as rebel control of Aleppo, Syria, continues to crumble.

"Russia and Assad have a moment where they are in a dominant position to show a little grace," he said after meeting in Paris with officials representing the countries that back Syrian opposition forces. "I believe there could be a way forward but it depends on big, magnanimous choices from Russia." American diplomats are also meeting with Russia on Saturday in Geneva to negotiate rebel fighters' exit from Aleppo and, Kerry emphasized, safe passage for civilians.

British Foreign Minister Boris Johnson, who was in Paris with Kerry, insisted the loss of Aleppo "will not change the fundamentals of the conflict," for which there "can be no military solution." "We must keep pushing for a return to a political process with the credibility necessary for all parties to commit to an end to all the fighting," Johnson added. Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016
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At least 50 people were killed and dozens more wounded by a suicide bomber in Yemen Saturday morning. The attack took place on a Yemeni army base in Aden where troops had lined up to collect their paychecks, and the Islamic State claimed responsibility for the bombing several hours after the incident in a statement online.

Other extremist groups including al Qaeda are also active in the region and have taken responsibility for similar strikes in the past. For more on Yemen's civil war, including Saudi Arabian and American involvement, see this analysis from The Week's Michael Brendan Dougherty. Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016
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President-elect Donald Trump's transition team sent a 74-question memo to managers within the Department of Energy (DOE) this week requesting, among other information, a list of all department employees and contractors who attended climate change policy conferences in recent years.

Viewed by Reuters on Friday, the document has reportedly caused alarm within the agency. "This feels like the first draft of an eventual political enemies list," said one Department of Energy employee, speaking on condition of anonymity. "When Donald Trump said he wanted to drain the swamp it apparently was just to make room for witch hunts and it's starting here at the DOE." Other information the memo requested includes emails pertaining to the climate change events and all publications penned by employees at the DOE's 17 national labs over the last three years.

Previous presidential teams have asked policy questions of agencies during their transitions, The New York Times reports, but this level of detail and the demand for specific names may be unprecedented. Still, a "lot of these questions make perfect sense," said Jonathan Levy, a former Obama deputy chief of staff for the DOE. "They have to get their heads around what responsibilities they will have and don't have. The thing that's unsettling are the questions that appear to be targeting personnel for doing public service."

It is not known whether a similar questionnaire has been sent to other agencies. The full list of 74 questions is available here. Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016
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Swedish furniture giant Ikea took the concept of "retail therapy" literally in its new advertising campaign, which renames the company's products with the most popular relationship questions on Google.

A double bed normally called Oppland, for example, is now named "How to have a happy relationship." There's a pair of scissors for those who googled "My son plays too much computer games" — a little cord-cutting, perhaps? — as well as champagne glasses for "When children leave home;" a lantern for "My boyfriend doesn't see me;" and, more ominously, a drill set for "Hard to get teenager out of bed."

The premise, explained the marketing agency behind the campaign, is that Ikea is "designed to solve everyday dilemmas" and — though unlikely to fix your relationship — "might be able to offer you some relief." The product description for each renamed piece cheerily explains it has a new title based on "the relationship problem you just googled. All to make life at home easier for you. Because life evolves every day and everything, yes everything, can get better." Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016
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The United States will send an additional 200 troops to Syria, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Saturday while speaking in Manama, Bahrain, bringing the total known number of American soldiers in the war-torn country to 500.

The new forces will head to Raqqa, the Islamic State's de facto capital city, where they will bring "the full weight of U.S. forces around the theater of operations, like the funnel of a giant tornado," Carter said. "By combining our capabilities with those of our local partners, we've been squeezing [ISIS] by applying simultaneous pressure from all sides and across domains, through a series of deliberate actions to continue to build momentum," he continued.

Congress has yet to pass an authorization for use of military force (AUMF) in Syria, a point which has been largely ignored in Washington since a bipartisan push for an AUMF failed last year when American special forces were first sent to Syria. "The Administration's announcement that it will deploy Special Operations Forces into Syria to combat [ISIS] marks a major shift in U.S. policy," said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) at the time, arguing that the Constitution's "War Powers Resolution requires Congress to debate and authorize the escalation of U.S. military involvement in Syria." Bonnie Kristian

December 10, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump sent out two tweets Saturday morning strongly criticizing any suggestion — specifically from CNN — that his ongoing role as executive producer of The New Celebrity Apprentice will in any way detract from his presidency.

As executive producer, Trump will be paid for each episode by MGM, the company of series creator Mark Burnett, and not by NBC, which airs the show. Top Trump aide Kellyanne Conway defended Trump's decision to remain a producer on Friday by comparing the role to President Obama's golf hobby. Bonnie Kristian

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