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February 23, 2016
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The Earth is exiting a long period of stable ocean and climate levels during which human civilization grew and flourished, and it's almost certainly due to human activity, scientists in the U.S. and Germany said in a pair of papers published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. One study, led by Rutgers climate scientist Robert Kopp, mapped out changes in sea levels around the globe over the past 2,800 years; oceans rose or fell no more than 1.5 inches a century from ancient Rome's founding until the Industrial Age in the 1800s, the study found, but rose 5.5 inches in the 20th century alone, accelerating to a rate of 12 inches a century by 1993.

The researchers blamed the increasing sea levels on rising global temperatures they and almost all other scientists attribute to the burning of fossil fuels. "Physics tells us that sea-level change and temperature change should go hand-in-hand," Kopp said. "This new geological record confirms it." Kopp and his team estimate that sea levels will rise 22 to 52 inches by 2100 at the current rate, or 11 to 22 inches if nations fully enact the global climate change treaty negotiated in Paris last year.

The second paper, led by Matthias Mengel of Germany's Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, similarly estimated that sea levels will rise three to four feet by 2100 if humans don't curb carbon emissions — roughly the same range predicted in 2013 by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Both papers acknowledged that there were significant unknowns in their analyses, but not in a way that should make humanity in general and coastal dwellers in particular feel any safer: If the massive ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica melt, as seems likely, most bets are off.

If that seems distant and theoretical, a third, unpublished study released Monday found that rising temperatures are responsible for a sharp increase in "nuisance floods" in seaside towns along the southern U.S. East Coast over the past 50 years, causing millions of dollars of damage due to incursions of a few feet of saltwater. Most of those floods wouldn't have happened without manmade global warming, the team, from Climate Central, reported. "I think we need a new way to think about most coastal flooding," said lead author Benjamin Strauss. "It's not the tide. It's not the wind. It's us. That's true for most of the coastal floods we now experience." Peter Weber

12:53 a.m. ET
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Arnold Schwarzenegger, former governor of California and current critic of President Trump, has a message from one Republican former host of The Apprentice to another.

"Don't touch California. If you want to drill, do it off Mar-a-Lago," he tweeted, referring to Trump's resort in Palm Beach, Florida. "Or better yet, look to the future, follow California's lead and go green and we can all breathe easier. The U.S.'s largest economy is nearly 50 percent renewable. #ProtectThePacific." Schwarzenegger wasn't finished. "Our fishing, tourism, and recreation industries employ hundreds of thousands of great people," he said in a follow-up tweet. "Our coasts are an economic gold mine. Do not put them at risk."

The Trump administration announced earlier this month it plans on allowing new offshore oil and gas drilling in almost all U.S. coastal waters. The plan took a turn not long after, when Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said Florida is "obviously unique" and "off the table." His announcement came just after he spoke with the state's Republican governor, Rick Scott. Catherine Garcia

12:22 a.m. ET
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The FBI has arrested an unidentified Michigan man who allegedly called CNN 22 times about a week ago and threatened to stage a mass shooting at CNN headquarters, Atlanta CBS affiliate WGCL-TV reported Monday, citing federal court documents. The man began by telling a CNN operator, "Fake news. I'm going to gun you all down," the court documents say, and later threats included: "I have more guns that you. More manpower. Your cast is about to get gunned down in a matter of hours"; and "I am coming to Georgia right now to go to the CNN headquarters to f---ing gun every single last one of you."

The FBI traced the calls to a house in the Detroit suburbs and arrested the man. "We take any threats to CNN employees or workplaces, around the world, extremely seriously," CNN said in a statement. "This one is no exception. We have been in touch with local and federal law enforcement throughout, and have taken all necessary measures to ensure the safety of our people." President Trump has repeatedly called CNN "fake news" and gave the network four of the 11 citations in his "Fake News Awards" last week. Peter Weber

January 22, 2018
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Authorities have raised the alert level for Mount Mayon to four on a scale of five, warning residents living near the most active volcano in the Philippines that a major eruption could happen within hours.

On Monday night, an ash plume rose up to 2 miles, and airplanes were not allowed to fly in the vicinity. A week ago, the volcano started to rumble, and rocks and debris have been tumbling down to the villages below ever since. More than 30,000 people living near the volcano in Albay province have been moved to evacuation centers, and so far, there are not reports of any deaths or injuries.

Mayon is 210 miles southeast of Manila, and its worst eruption took place in 1814, when more than 1,200 people were killed and the entire town of Cagsawa was buried underneath volcanic mud. Catherine Garcia

January 22, 2018
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On Monday night, Neil Diamond announced that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and is retiring from touring, starting with the third leg of his 50th Anniversary tour in March. "It is with great reluctance and disappointment that I announce my retirement from concert touring," Diamond said in a statement, going on to thank his fans with a shout-out to his most famous song, "Sweet Caroline." "My thanks goes out to my loyal and devoted audiences around the world. You will always have my appreciation for your support and encouragement. This ride has been 'so good, so good, so good' thanks to you."

Diamond's touring career may be over, but he said he still plans to write and record songs, and develop new projects. Fans in Australia and New Zealand who have tickets to his canceled performances will get refunds. Parkinson's is a degenerative disease that slowly degrades motor skills like walking and talking, with accompanying shaking and stiffness. Diamond said the recent onset of the disorder made it difficult to tour, and he is acting on the advice of his doctor. He turns 77 on Jan. 28. Peter Weber

January 22, 2018
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A veterans organization says it is being censored by the NFL after the league rejected its one-page ad, with the message "Please Stand," from the upcoming Super Bowl's program, saying it's too political.

"The Super Bowl game program is designed for fans to commemorate and celebrate the game, players, teams, and the Super Bowl," NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told USA Today Sports. "It's never been a place for advertising that could be considered by some as a political statement." He added that the NFL has "long supported the military and veterans and will again salute our service members in the Super Bowl with memorable on-field moments that will be televised as part of the game."

AMVETS said it has placed similar ads in official NHL and NBA programs, and its executive director, Joe Chenelly, believes his group deserves the same platform as players who are protesting police brutality by kneeling during the national anthem. The protests are "very much out of our purview," he told USA Today Sports, and the ads are part of the group's attempts to teach people about the flag and how to care for it. McCarthy said AMVETS was asked to consider other taglines, including "Please Honor Our Vets" and "Please Stand for Our Veterans," but the organization never responded, and the program had to go to the printer. Catherine Garcia

January 22, 2018
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With President Trump's blessing, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been pressuring FBI Director Christopher Wray to fire Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, but Wray has threatened to resign if McCabe is forced out, three people with direct knowledge of the matter told Axios.

Sessions told White House counsel Don McGahn that Wray is distressed by the request, Axios reports, and McGahn in turn said it's not worth losing the director, especially in the wake of Trump firing former FBI Director James Comey last year. Trump nominated Wray last June, and he previously served as deputy attorney general under former President George W. Bush. McCabe was acting director of the FBI after Comey was fired, and Trump and other Republicans want him gone because his wife ran for office as a Democrat. Catherine Garcia

January 22, 2018
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Naomi Parker Fraley, a former waitress who inspired the artist behind the 1943 "We Can Do It!" poster, died Saturday in Longview, Washington. She was 96.

Several people claimed to be the model for the poster, which was created for the Westinghouse Electric Corp., but in 2016, Seton Hall University professor James Kimble discovered that artist J. Howard Miller had most likely been inspired by a photo of Fraley that appeared in newspapers across the country. The photo showed Fraley, who worked in a Navy machine shop during World War II, standing at an industrial lathe, her hair up in a polka-dotted bandana. "The women of this country these days need some icons," Fraley told People in 2016, after Kimble tracked her down. "If they think I'm one, I'm happy."

Fraley was 20 when she she started working at the machine shop, along with her younger sister, Ada, and they spent their days drilling, patching airplane wings, and riveting. The poster was up in Westinghouse factories for a only brief time, and it didn't become a feminist symbol, with the woman dubbed Rosie the Riveter, until the early 1980s, The New York Times reports. Catherine Garcia

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