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March 16, 2016
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Paul Ryan saved the Republican Party from itself once. But can he do it again? John Boehner seems to think so.

Paul Ryan reluctantly agreed to become speaker of the House last fall, seeking to placate conservatives who had become fed up with the Republican House leadership under John Boehner. Now former Speaker John Boehner — the embodiment of House conservatives' frustration — is pushing his successor to run for another job: president of the United States.

Boehner threw his support behind Ryan at a news conference in Boca Raton, Florida. Though Politico reports that Boehner has casually floated Ryan as an option if the party can't coalesce around a single candidate, this is the first time he has said so publicly.

"If we don't have a nominee who can win on the first ballot, I'm for none of the above," Boehner said. "They all had a chance to win. None of them won... I'm for Paul Ryan to be our nominee."

Though members of Ryan's staff have pushed back on the notion that their boss has any interest in seeking the nomination, the House speaker has repeatedly rebuked likely GOP nominee Donald Trump, criticizing him for his proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from entering the United States, for failing to forcefully disavow the informal endorsement of former KKK Grand Wizard David Duke, and for inciting violence at his rallies.

With resounding victories in Florida, Illinois, and North Carolina, the prospect of a Trump nomination and party revolt at the Republican Convention this summer is growing more and more likely. Boehner's suggestion of Ryan might be a shot in the dark, but perhaps many in the GOP are feeling pretty desperate right now. Benjamin Shull

9:29 p.m. ET

South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met Friday in the demilitarized zone between their countries, and held hands as they crossed into South Korea.

When Kim crossed the demarcation line, he became the first North Korean leader to enter South Korea since the Korean War, and Moon was also invited to step over to the North Korea side. This is the first meeting of Korean leaders in more than a decade.

During their summit, meant to ease tensions between the Koreas, they are expected to discuss denuclearization and will plant a memorial tree in the border village of Panmunjom. They will also likely release a joint statement late Friday, which could touch on peace and the improvement of relations between the two countries. Because the Korean War ended in a truce and not a peace treaty, the countries are still considered to be at war. Catherine Garcia

8:43 p.m. ET
John Stillwell/AFP/Getty Images

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge welcomed their third child, a boy, on Monday, and while they've revealed his weight and the time he was born, they've remained mum about one very important detail: the little prince's name.

Not content with waiting for an official announcement, internet sleuths turned to the royal family's website for some clues. They found that most members of the family have their own pages, including Queen Elizabeth and Prince Harry, which follow the same pattern: royal.uk/their-name. On Prince George and Princess Charlotte's pages, it says "access denied," and that same message popped up when people tried to visit royal.uk/prince-albert. Type in other names, like prince-james and prince-arthur, and it merely says the page cannot be found.

Since this was discovered, the royal web developer made a change — now, royal.uk/prince-albert redirects to the website's home page. Albert is a name that runs in the royal family — there was Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert, and it was also King George VI's birth name and one of Prince Andrew and Prince Harry's middle names. Albert was rumored to be one of the names under consideration, with British bookmakers at one point having the odds at 5-1, so for those who thought the baby might be named Prince Brayden Jayden Kayden, sorry. Catherine Garcia

7:56 p.m. ET
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Subway plans on closing about 500 locations in the United States, but will open more than 1,000 restaurants in Mexico, China, India, and the United Kingdom, CNBC reports.

The sandwich chain has more than 40,000 locations around the world, and counts Panera Bread and Chipotle as competitors. In 2017, 800 restaurants were closed, and a spokesman told CNBC "looking out over the next decade, we anticipate having a slightly smaller but more profitable footprint in North America and a significantly larger footprint in the rest of the world."

Subways are owned by franchisees, and the company is working on a new loyalty program and a modern concept store featuring ordering kiosks and fresh menu items. Catherine Garcia

7:05 p.m. ET
AP Photo/Eric Murinzi

More than two decades after the Rwandan genocide, four new mass graves have been found in Kigali Province, containing 2,000 to 3,000 bodies.

The first bodies were found Sunday, Rwanda's The New Times reports, and the excavation is ongoing. An old photo album was found in one of the graves, and relatives of people who have been missing since the genocide have flocked to the area, hoping to find out if their relatives are buried there.

More than 800,000 people, Tutsi and moderate Hutus, were murdered during the 1994 genocide. Survivors want to know why it took so long for the graves to be discovered, with one telling The Associated Press, "Those who participated in the killing of our relatives don't want to tell us where they buried them. How can you reconcile with such people?" Catherine Garcia

5:47 p.m. ET

Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) has been publicly admonished.

The Senate Ethics Committee has issued a public letter of admonition to the senator after he refused to disclose gifts from Florida eye doctor Salomon Melgen and allegedly used his job in the Senate to advance Melgen's interests.

Melgen was sentenced to 17 years in prison after swindling $73 million from Medicare, per the Sun Sentinel. Menendez accepted flights and hotel stays from the doctor, and intervened when Medicare discovered it had been overbilled by Melgen, per the letter. A federal judge acquitted Menendez and Melgen on several charges of bribery earlier this year, though the Justice Department said it intends to retry the pair.

Menendez has denied all charges against him and so far, he has escaped severe punishment — until now, with the Senate's stern warning letter. The activist group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington notes that Thursday's note from the Ethics Committee is actually the "harshest thing they've done in years."

It even finishes with this stinger: "Finally, by this letter, you are hereby severely admonished." Kathryn Krawczyk

5:47 p.m. ET
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

The FBI warned the White House of former Staff Secretary Rob Porter's abuse allegations in three separate reports months before he resigned, The New York Times reported Thursday.

Porter resigned in February after two of his former wives publicly alleged that he had physically abused them. The White House claimed that no senior officials knew about the allegations until the week of his departure, but documents reviewed by the Times show that the FBI gave White House Counsel Don McGahn a report that "contained derogatory information" back in March 2017.

A former federal law enforcement official said that the abuse allegations were included in the report, which the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is reviewing in order to determine how Porter was given high-level security clearance despite abuse claims. The FBI reportedly reached out to the White House about Porter a second time, in July 2017, and a third time in November 2017.

The Times report casts doubt on the previous explanation from the White House about Porter's employment. At the time of Porter's resignation, officials claimed that the report they received in March didn't include anything about spousal abuse. One White House official insisted to the Times that McGahn never saw the July report and explained that lower-level staffers must have failed to pass it along to the "right people." Read more at The New York Times. Summer Meza

4:52 p.m. ET
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The parents of a college student held captive in North Korea have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the country.

Otto Warmbier, 22, was held in North Korea for 17 months after allegedly stealing a political poster while touring the country. He was medically evacuated from North Korea last June and died a few days after returning home in a coma.

Now, his parents say he was "brutally tortured and murdered" and forced to "falsely 'confess' to an act of subversion on behalf of the United States government," per the lawsuit. They are suing to hold the government of North Korea "legally accountable" for their son's death, per The Washington Post, and are seeking damages.

North Korea alleges Warmbier died after contracting botulism and has denied nefarious involvement. But a U.S. coroner said an injury more than a year old, which starved Warmbier's brain of oxygen, caused his death. There were no clear signs of torture to Warmbier's body, the coroner said.

The suit comes amid a softening of tensions between North Korea and the U.S. Just-confirmed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo visited Kim Jong Un over Easter weekend, and President Trump is narrowing down a time to meet with the North Korean leader, per CNN.

Fred Warmbier, Otto's father and one of the plaintiffs, was Vice President Mike Pence's guest at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. Kathryn Krawczyk

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