×
FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
October 3, 2017

Rock superstar Tom Petty died Monday night, after suffering cardiac arrest late Sunday at his home in Malibu, his band's longtime manager Tony Dimitriade announced Monday night. Petty "could not be revived" at the UCLA Medical Center, Dimitriade said. "He died peacefully at 8:40 p.m. PT surrounded by family, his bandmates, and friends." Petty was 66. He had just wrapped up a summer tour with his band, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, at the Hollywood Bowl on Sept. 25.

Petty was born Oct. 20, 1950, in Gainesville, Florida, and he traced his interest in rock 'n' roll to a meeting with Elvis Presley his uncle set up at a local movie shoot when Petty was 11. The Heartbreakers grew out of his band Mudcrutch, which fell apart after moving to Los Angeles and signing a record deal. The band's early hits include "Breakdown," "Refugee," and "Don't Do Me Like That." In the '80s, Petty sang a hit duet with Stevie Nicks, "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around," then climbed the charts with "Don't Come Around Here No More" in 1985.

In 1988, Petty took a break from the Heartbreakers to join Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Roy Orbison, and Jeff Lynn in The Traveling Wilburys, and in between the super-group's two albums, he recorded a solo album, Full Moon Fever, whose hits "Free Fallin'" and "Won't Back Down" made Petty a huge star. He recorded another hit album with the Heartbreakers, Into the Great Wide Open, in 1991. The title song's video featured Johnny Depp and Faye Dunaway.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, which was active up until his death, was inaugurated into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2002, and Petty was honored with UCLA's George and Ira Gershwin Award for lifetime achievement in 1996. Petty's long marriage to Jane Benyo fell apart in the mid-1990s as Petty got hooked on heroin for a few years. But the love of music stayed with him until the end. "Music, as far as I have seen in the world so far, is the only real magic that I know," he told CNN in 2007. "There is something really honest and clean and pure and it touches you in your heart." Peter Weber

12:44 p.m. ET
AFP contributor/Getty Images

Unusually catastrophic monsoon rains continued Saturday in the southern Indian state of Kerala, where more than 300,000 people have now evacuated their homes to escape rising floodwaters. Another 10,000 are thought to be trapped on their roofs awaiting rescue.

Severe flooding has lasted for more than a week, and at least 324 people have died in connection to the floods. More rain is expected at least through Monday, hindering already fraught rescue efforts. Nevertheless, 82,000 rescues were completed on Friday alone.

"It's a four-story house, but water started pouring in fast until it reached the second floor and stayed that way for two days," said one woman named Shrinni, who lives with her family in a town called Ranni. "My relatives shifted to the top floor with all the stuff they immediately needed. An airlift came, but as my 85-year-old grandmother had never taken a flight in her life and she was afraid to go. So the whole family stayed back. On Friday, rescuers came with motor boats and shifted them to a safe place." Bonnie Kristian

12:12 p.m. ET

President Trump this week revoked security clearance for former CIA Director John Brennan, and Saturday morning he continued his feud with Brennan on Twitter:

The tweet may have been prompted by an interview Brennan gave on MSNBC Friday night. "The fact that [Trump is] using a security clearance of a former CIA director as a pawn in his public relations strategy I think is so reflective of somebody who is drunk on power," Brennan told host Rachel Maddow. "I think he's abusing the powers of that office."

Brennan argued Trump's decision "flies in the face of traditional practice, as well as common sense, as well as national security." The former CIA director's cause has been supported by a dozen former U.S. intelligence chiefs; Trump meanwhile, reportedly intends to revoke other people's security clearances, too. Bonnie Kristian

11:00 a.m. ET

Police in Weld County, Colorado, northeast of Denver, on Thursday found the bodies of Shannan Watts and her two daughters, Bella, 4, and Celeste, 3. Watts was pregnant with her third child.

The family members are believed to have been killed by their husband and father, Chris Watts, who has been arrested but not yet formally charged. He reportedly confessed to the crime after his arrest and is expected to face murder charges by Monday.

The bodies were found on the property of a petroleum and natural gas exploration company where Chris used to work. Court documents filed Friday suggest strangulation may be the cause of death. Bonnie Kristian

10:21 a.m. ET

The weapon used in the Saudi-led coalition airstrike on a school bus in Yemen earlier this month that killed 51 people, 40 of them children, and wounded over 100 more was manufactured in the United States, CNN reported Friday night.

The bomb in question was reportedly a 500-pound laser-guided MK 82 bomb produced by Lockheed Martin, an American defense contractor. It was identified from numbers on the shrapnel.

The Saudi coalition, which has been credibly accused of war crimes in Yemen, is supported and enabled by the United States. The coalition promised to investigate itself for this attack.

A coalition representative declined to comment on the airstrike while the self-investigation is underway, and a Pentagon representative would not confirm the bomb's origin, instead providing CNN a generic condemnation of civilian casualties. Bonnie Kristian

10:13 a.m. ET

Former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan died Saturday after a brief illness, his family reported via his personal foundation. He was 80 years old.

Born in Ghana in 1938, Annan began work at the U.N. in 1962, rising through the ranks to serve as secretary general from 1997 to 2006. He shared the Nobel Peace Prize with the U.N. in 2001.

Current U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres said Annan "provided people everywhere with a space for dialogue, a place for problem-solving, and a path to a better world." Annan is survived by his wife and three children. Bonnie Kristian

8:23 a.m. ET
AFP contributor/Getty Images

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is seeking a short prison sentence of up to six months for former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos, who allegedly delayed federal investigators by lying to them.

"[Papadopoulos'] lies undermined investigators' ability to challenge the Professor or potentially detain or arrest him while he was still in the United States," Mueller's team said in court filings Friday. "The defendant's false statements were intended to harm the investigation, and did so."

The "Professor" in question is Joseph Mifsud, who reportedly has ties to the Russian government and contacted Papadopoulos offering "dirt" on Hillary Clinton during the campaign. Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying about Mifsud to the FBI in October.

Papadopoulos and his attorney could not be reached by Wall Street Journal requests to comment on the possible jail time, but Simona Mangiante Papadopoulos, George's wife, has been publicly asking President Trump to pardon him. Bonnie Kristian

8:04 a.m. ET

President Trump on Saturday alleged on Twitter, to his 53.8 million followers, whom he reaches for free via the network's platform, that social media is censoring the right:

In follow-up tweets, the president spun a confusing and contradictory approach to censorship, apparently speaking in response to conspiracy-monger (and Trump fan) Alex Jones' internet woes:

So, to summarize: Social media is censoring Republicans, and our Republican president is letting us know via social media. Censorship cannot be policed, but the Trump administration won't let it happen! Trump himself deplores censorship and thinks everyone should speak in the public square, but he definitely would prefer to censor CNN and MSNBC, who are "Fake News" and would ideally be weeded out. Got it? Bonnie Kristian

See More Speed Reads