Quarter of Brits believe they could commit ‘perfect crime’

Watching TV detective dramas makes millions think they could get away with criminal act

How accurate is TV forensics to the real thing?
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Nearly a quarter of Britons who watch TV detective dramas believe they could get away with the perfect crime because they are so clued up on the mistakes criminals make in the shows.

A study of 2,000 TV crime fans commissioned by Fox to celebrate the launch of series four of NCIS: New Orleans revealed that a quarter think they could solve a crime because of the knowledge they’ve accumulated from episodes of detective dramas.

One in five think they would know whom to befriend to remain undetected if they were to break the law, and a similar number reckon they would find the ideal location to carry out their “perfect crime” without being traced.

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“With crime dramas proving ever-popular, it is not surprising that avid fans pick up key investigative techniques, allowing them to help solve the gritty and complex cases they revel in watching,” said a spokesman for Fox. “These are the true armchair detectives.”

TV crime dramas may also be acting as a boon for police recruitment. The survey found that three in ten people have thought of changing careers to a profession which allows them to live the life of a TV show detective.

Of these, nearly half have looked into a career as a forensic scientist and 36% have debated retraining as a detective.

A quarter have contemplated a future as a criminologist, and an equal number have thought of following in the footsteps of James Bond and applying to be a spy.

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