Why America's abortion debate is murkier and more complex than ever

Two-thirds of Americans want to uphold Roe v. Wade. But only 13 percent believe abortion is morally acceptable

The annual "March for Life" anti-abortion rally in Washington, D.C.
(Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

During the 2012 election cycle, the Democratic Party enjoyed considerable success staking out strongly liberal positions on gay marriage and contraception. Now, apparently, leading Democrats and powerful liberal interest groups are pondering whether to extend this muscular social-issues agenda to the abortion-rights cause — in some cases, by working to guarantee the availability of late-term abortions. The temptation to lump all social issues together is understandable after liberals' 2012 success. But giving in to it would be politically foolish and morally reckless.

To begin to see why, consider what has enabled Democrats to exploit contraception and gay marriage for political gain.

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