The 2012 Nissan GT-R

What the critics say about the $89,950 Nissan GT-R

Road & Track

Three years after the GT-R’s launch, Nissan has turned its “tough brute” of a supercar into a “polished gentleman.” Stomp the gas and you now reach “warp speed” with assurance, thanks to an improved launch-control feature. Sleeker aerodynamics and a unique twist—yaw-rate feedback control—have meanwhile upgraded the backroads ride. All this technology is comparatively bargain-priced, too. “Get in line now if you consider value to be a priority for supercar performance.”

EdmundsInsideLine.com

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Once a machine with about as much personality as “a digital coffee maker,” the GT-R has matured into a “wildly capable supercar.” Its twin-turbo engine puts out 530 hp, the suspension is substantially redesigned, and a remapped vehicle dynamic control system helps to coordinate it all. But don’t mistake control for blandness. “There’s nothing bland about the GT-R.”

Automobile

Despite the many improvements, this car continues to confound us. We’re not faulting its performance, exactly: Its handling “remains unbelievably forgiving,” and, overall, the car is “incredibly adept at reading the intentions of the driver.” Upgrades have even made the seats wider, softer, and more supportive. But the GT-R lacks personality, especially when it’s not being pushed to its limit. It offers “computer-controlled, emotionless speed” where we had expected more charm.

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