Feature

Justices approve psychedelic tea

The week's news at a glance.

Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously this week that a New Mexico church with roots in South America may use hallucinogenic tea as part of its four-hour shamanistic rituals. The tea, ayahuasca, contains an illegal drug known as DMT. Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for the court, said the substance’s use by the 140 members of O Centro Espirita Beneficiente Uniao do Vegetal is protected under the Constitution as a “sincere religious practice.” The church contends that the ritualistic use of the tea brings its members closer to God. The newest justice, Samuel Alito, did not take part in the case, which was argued before he joined the Court.

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