Feature

Spying from space

The week's news at a glance.

Tanegashima, Japan

Japan launched its first spy satellites into orbit last week, prompting an angry reaction from North Korea. “Japan will be held fully responsible for causing a new arms race in Northeast Asia,” a North Korean Foreign Ministry statement warned. It called the launches “a hostile activity” that posed “a grave threat” to the communist state. Tensions have risen in the region in the past few months, since the U.S. accused North Korea of restarting its nuclear weapons program, and North Korea expelled U.N. inspectors. Japanese Defense Agency chief Shigeru Ishiba downplayed the North Korean response. He said the satellites were intended purely to gather information to protect Japan, “not to attack some other country in the realm of science fiction.”

Recommended

Kim Jong Un admits North Korea's food situation is dire
Kim Jong Un.
crisis

Kim Jong Un admits North Korea's food situation is dire

The Biden comment that likely got Putin's attention
Joe Biden.
biden-putin summit

The Biden comment that likely got Putin's attention

The 5 weirdest moments of the Biden-Putin summit
Biden and Putin.
'There is no happiness in life'

The 5 weirdest moments of the Biden-Putin summit

Biden says Russia faces 'devastating' consequences if Navalny dies
Joe Biden.
Biden-Putin summit

Biden says Russia faces 'devastating' consequences if Navalny dies

Most Popular

Bernie Sanders wants to know if cannabis reporter is 'stoned' right now
Bernie Sanders.
Sounds dope

Bernie Sanders wants to know if cannabis reporter is 'stoned' right now

SCOTUS deals blow to sentencing reform
The Supreme Court.
Picture of Bonnie KristianBonnie Kristian

SCOTUS deals blow to sentencing reform

Stephen Colbert gleefully returns to a live studio audience
Stephen Colbert
Last Night on Late Night

Stephen Colbert gleefully returns to a live studio audience