The satisfying art of the to-do list

Getting stuff done never felt so good

A written list can improve efficiency.
(Image credit: venimo / Alamy Stock Photo)

Before I wrote this article, I wrote a to-do list.

Well, actually, I revised my existing to-do list. I crossed off a few things and added a few others, and then I rewrote the whole thing on a clean sheet of paper in blood-red Sharpie, my current favorite way to make a to-do list. You can't forget about bright red letters the same way you can allow Bic-black ink to blur at the edges of your mind. Sure, you can try to ignore them, but you'll keep catching glimpses of color from wherever you sit in the room, and that may inspire you to start actually getting stuff done.

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