Feature

6 gorgeous homes in Utah

It doesn't hurt to look!

Park City. This four-bedroom home sits on a 4.26-acre equestrian property overlooking Park City Resort. Sustainably built using steel beams and reclaimed timber, with solar panels and a high Energy Star rating, the house also features tile, stone, brick, and oak floors; a stone fireplace; a chef's kitchen; and a sauna.

Outside are three covered decks with mountain and valley views, patios, landscaping, and a three-car garage. $3,495,000. Kevin Crockett and Lana Harris, Coldwell Banker Realty, (435) 602-4800.

Salt Lake City. Set in the ­Arlington Hills, this five-bedroom home has 360-degree views of downtown and Mount Olympus. The 1994 house, remodeled in 2014, has a spiral central staircase, a skylight, oversize windows, marble fireplaces, a master suite with balcony, a finished basement with kitchen, and an indoor lap pool.

On the half-acre lot are lawns, mature plantings, fountains, and a circular driveway. $1,895,000. Cherie Major, Windermere Real Estate/Luxury Portfolio International, (801) 485-3151.

Midway. From a mountainside ­bordering Wasatch State Park, this four-bedroom home overlooks the Provo River, Heber Valley, and Mount Timpanogos. The house features 150-year-old hardwood floors, a great room with 25-foot-high stone fireplace, a wine cellar, and a master suite with spa bathroom and sauna.

The 1.5-acre property includes automated lighting, a generator, and a swimming pool with ­waterfalls and a fire feature. $2,650,000. Court ­Klekas, Engel & Völkers Park City, (435) 640-5080.

Sundance. Part of Sundance's only gated community, this five-bedroom home offers easy access to skiing, hiking, and biking. The remodeled interior includes a great room with a stone fireplace, a game room with reclaimed-wood walls, and a chef's kitchen leading out to a deck with a hot tub.

The 0.63-acre wooded lot features a heated driveway and mountain views; an adjoining lot is also for sale. $1,980,000. Paul Benson, Engel & Völkers Park City, (435) 640-7441.

Salt Lake City. Perched in the foothills of Ensign Downs, this 1957 four-bedroom home has panoramic mountain and valley views. The ranch-style house has been extensively renovated; details include sliding glass doors, a wet bar, a living room with unique fireplace, and a primary suite with walk-in closet and dual bathroom.

The fenced quarter-acre lot has lawns, a large patio, and climate-appropriate minimalist landscaping. $1,199,000. Brian Tripoli, City Home Collective, (801) 809-9804.

Moab. This 1946 two-bedroom log-and-stone cabin looks out on the La Sal Mountains and Moab Rim. Completely reconstructed, it features interior masonry of Colorado Plateau stone and fossils, oversize windows, a new vaulted living-room ceiling, updated kitchen and bathroom, and an added sunroom and loft area.

The property, in Pack Creek Ranch, includes access to a community pool, hot tub, and sauna, historic outbuildings, and pastures. $445,000. Lenore Beeson, Byrd & Co. Real Estate, (435) 260-2135.

This article was first published in the latest issue of The Week magazine. If you want to read more like it, you can try six risk-free issues of the magazine here.

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