Archaeologists discover ancient Roman inscription that could explain mystery of Jewish revolt

Archaeologists discover ancient Roman inscription that could explain mystery of Jewish revolt
(Image credit: Twitter)

Israeli archaeologists have announced the discovery of a stone with Latin engravings outside Jerusalem's old city. The stone, which was discovered in July and unveiled Tuesday, supports the idea that Jewish people revolted against Rome because the Romans treated them with cruelty.

The Bar Kochba Revolt (also known as the second Jewish revolt) occurred roughly 2,000 years ago, three years after the Roman emperor Hadrian visited Jerusalem in 129 C.E. The Bar Kochba revolt in the second century C.E. is described by Cassius Dio, a Roman historian. The stone suggests that Hadrian's visit is indeed correlated to the revolt: Israel's Antiquities Authority said that the stone's engraving includes Hadrian's name.

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