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Archaeologists discover 4,500-year-old statue of mysterious Egyptian pharaoh

You might be able to walk like an Egyptian, but have you heard of King Sahure?

Historians don't know much about Sahure, a pharaoh who ruled almost 4,500 years ago, during the Old Kingdom's Fifth Dynasty. Before an incredible new discovery, there were only two known statues of Sahure in the world.

Now, Belgian archaeologists have made what Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities is calling a find "of great significance and importance." The team discovered a broken statue, which they believe represents Sahure, in Aswan, about 360 miles south of Cairo. Aswan was once the ancient city of Swenett, a "frontier town" of ancient Egypt, explains Ancient Origins.

The ministry believes that the newly discovered base, which is inscribed with Sahure's name, is the bottom half of a statue depicting Sahure seated on a throne. The team will continue excavating the site to see if the area holds more clues and artifacts about the mysterious king.