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fixing a hole

TSA chief replaced after dismal airport security findings

The Transportation Security Administration's poor track record with airport security, highlighted in a report on Monday, did not go unnoticed by the TSA's parent agency, the Department of Homeland Security.

DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson replaced the TSA's acting administrator, Melvin Carraway, with its acting deputy director, Mark Hatfield, until a permanent replacement is installed — President Obama nominated Coast Guard Vice Adm. Pete Neffenger in April, but the Senate hasn't confirmed him. Carraway was reassigned to another post at DHS.

Johnson said that the numbers reported from the classified DHS inspector general's report — TSA agents failed to detect fake bombs and other weapons in 67 of 70 covert tests — "never look good out of context, but they are a critical element in the continual evolution of our aviation security." He announced several steps meant to improve airport security, including new screening procedures, training for all TSA officers and especially supervisors, and re-evaluating current screening systems. Undercover, randomly timed security tests will continue.

Despite the bad report, "TSA screened a record number of passengers at airports in the United States," Johnson said, and "seized a record number of prohibited items." Still, he added, he is taking the reports findings "very seriously."