Starting in 2014, police officers were told not to go through a phone without a warrant.
(Image credit: iStock)

The Miranda warning is familiar to any American who has taken a high school civics class or watched an episode of any police procedural show. We know we have the right to remain silent — but what about our cell phones?

Since Miranda v. Arizona (1966), the Supreme Court case that established the basic caution against self-incrimination, technological advances mean the phones we all carry can offer far more damning evidence than much of what we might say. To adapt to that new legal reality, Cyrus Farivar at Ars Technica has proposed a "digital Miranda warning" crafted with the help of legal experts:

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