Human skull found in Greek cave is oldest ever discovered outside Africa

The entrance to a cave.
(Image credit: iStock)

Researchers who used modern technology to study two skulls found 41 years ago in Greece have dated one of the skulls to 210,000 years ago, and believe this is the earliest evidence of modern humans in Eurasia.

In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, the researchers write that the skulls were found in southern Greece in a cave that can now only be reached by water. One skull, called Apidima 1, is 210,000 years old, which is 160,000 years older than previous discoveries, CNN reports. The other skull, dubbed Apidima 2, was more complete than Apidima 1, and belonged to a Neanderthal who lived in the area 170,000 years ago. The oldest recovered fossils of early humans go back to 315,000 years ago, and were found in Morocco.

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