What does the Hollywood writers' strike mean for your favorite shows?

Not all productions will be affected equally

Writers strike in New York City
(Image credit: LEONARDO MUNOZ/AFP via Getty Images)

The strike is on. For the first time in 15 years, Hollywood writers have gone on strike as they call for changes in the way they're compensated due to the rise of streaming. The strike began on May 2 following six weeks of negotiations between the Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, which did not end in an agreement for a new contract by a May 1 deadline.

"Though our negotiating committee began this process intent on making a fair deal, the studios' responses have been wholly insufficient given the existential crisis writers are facing," the WGA said, while the AMPTP, which represents the major studios and streamers, said it hopes to "reach a deal that is mutually beneficial to writers and the health and longevity of the industry."

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Brendan Morrow

Brendan worked as a culture writer at The Week from 2018 to 2023, covering the entertainment industry, including film reviews, television recaps, awards season, the box office, major movie franchises and Hollywood gossip. He has written about film and television for outlets including Bloody Disgusting, Showbiz Cheat Sheet, Heavy and The Celebrity Cafe.