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July 25, 2014
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White House officials said on Thursday that the Obama administration is contemplating giving minors from Honduras refugee status as a way to slow down the number of unaccompanied children making their way to the United States.

While no final decisions have been made and several ideas are still on the table, one proposal is to screen young people while they are still in Honduras to see if they qualify for refugee status, The Associated Press reports. This is similar to programs that took place in East Asia after the Vietnam War and in Haiti in the 1990s.

The United Nations has requested that the United States treat children coming to the U.S./Mexico border from Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala as refugees displaced by armed conflict. The region is extremely dangerous, the U.N. says, with drug traffickers controlling large areas and street gangs running rampant.

Since Oct. 1, 2013, more than 16,000 Honduran children traveling alone have been caught or turned themselves in after crossing the Mexican border. Catherine Garcia

8:23 a.m. ET

When saying goodbye to Ted Cruz's presidential aspirations last night, the nation was also unwittingly bidding adieu to a young president. With the 45-year-old out of the race, electing any of the remaining candidates will be putting the oldest (or nearly the oldest) president ever into office:

It might be pointed out that John Kasich, who is still in the race, is a relative picture of youth at 63. However, his odds of assuming office are not good. Jeva Lange

8:16 a.m. ET

What happened in Paris and Brussels could possibly happen in the U.S., Director of National Intelligence James Clapper admitted in an exclusive interview with CNN, published Wednesday. "They do have that capacity," Clapper said of ISIS. "That's something we worry about a lot in the United States, that they could conjure up a raid like they did in Paris or Brussels." The March attacks in Brussels on a train and at an airport left at 32 dead and 300 injured; the November attacks in Paris killed at least 130.

However, Obama pointed out, "we, here in the United States, face less of a threat than Europe" from ISIS. Still, he says, "the Paris-style attack, the Brussels style attack is the challenge that we're going to continue to face." Becca Stanek

8:14 a.m. ET
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Shortly after Donald Trump all but clinched the GOP nomination with his victory in the Indiana primary Tuesday night, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) unleashed a full line of attacks. Warren hit Trump on everything from his "racism, sexism, and xenophobia" to his "nonsensical national security ideas" before vowing to fight tooth and nail to make sure that Trump never reaches the Oval Office:

Becca Stanek

7:52 a.m. ET
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The legendary musician Prince was trying to meet with a doctor about a painkiller addiction the day before he died, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reports. Representatives of Prince reached out to Dr. Howard Kornfeld on the night of April 20 and told him Prince was "dealing with a grave medical emergency."

While Howard Kornfeld could not clear his schedule to fly out the next day, he sent his son, Andrew Kornfeld, ahead of him and planned to follow later. When Andrew Kornfeld arrived at Paisley Park at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Prince's representatives were unable to locate Prince. Andrew Kornfeld was one of three people who discovered the musician unconscious in an elevator, and it was Andrew who placed the 911 call.

Painkillers were also discovered at the scene — investigators are actively working to learn how Prince got the pills, and who provided them.

Sources said it was hoped Prince would agree to travel to California for round-the-clock support at Kornfeld's renowned clinic, the Star Tribune reports. Six days before his death, Prince's plane made an emergency landing; those with direct knowledge of the situation said the landing occurred because Prince was overdosing on opioids. Jeva Lange

7:22 a.m. ET
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images

With Ted Cruz out of the presidential race, there is little doubt remaining that Donald Trump will be the Republican nominee. Looking ahead to a general election, however, Trump does not fair well against either Democratic candidate.

In a new CNN/ORC poll completed before Tuesday's primary results in Indiana, Clinton led Trump by 54 percent to 41 percent — the 13-point advantage being her largest lead since last summer. The results found that Bernie Sanders has an even bigger edge on Trump, beating him by 16 points.

John Kasich — whose odds at becoming the Republican nominee are nearly insurmountable — actually beats Clinton in the polls, and sits only 4 points behind Sanders.

The poll surveyed 1,001 adults and among them, 890 registered voters, and had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 points for the results of the registered voters. The poll was conducted between April 28 and May 1. Jeva Lange

5:19 a.m. ET

On Monday night's Jimmy Kimmel Live, Kimmel devoted a segment of the show to debunking Sarah Palin and other climate change deniers. He said then he knew he would get "beaten over the head" for the bit, and on Tuesday's show, he read some of the comments. Social media is a double-edged sword, he began, noting that before Twitter and Facebook, people had to send nasty comments through the mail, while now "they can go online and torpedo that rage directly at me immediately."

With the explanation of social media out of the way, Kimmel read a "sampling of the warm sentiments I received, and I just want to say up front, it might seem like I only pick comments from people whose grammar is bad, but the truth is, the vast majority of the negative comments came from people whose grammar is bad." If you've ever taken the time to read the comments section of any website, you've seen worse, but there are some doozies. Kimmel ended on a pretty dark note, though: "Some of it got me kind of mad, the ignorance, but ultimately, I have to say, after reading all this, I'm now kind of okay with global warming wiping out the human race. It turns out we deserve it." Watch. Peter Weber

4:18 a.m. ET

Tuesday's Late Show taped before Stephen Colbert learned that Donald Trump won the Indiana Republican primary and Ted Cruz dropped out of the race. "But I do know that it was do-or-die for Sen. Ted Cruz — and judging by this picture, I'm going to say he died about a week ago," he said. Instead of talking about future events, Colbert looked at what ended up being Cruz's last stand, including his getting stomped by quick-witted Trump supporters in Indiana and Trump's own conspiracy theory, unveiled Tuesday morning, that Cruz's father met with Lee Harvey Oswald soon before Oswald assassinated President John F. Kennedy, based on a report in the National Enquirer.

"This is horrible — and not just for Cruz," Colbert said. "Oliver Stone is kicking himself for not thinking of this." But instead of just laughing at Trump, he had a better conspiracy theory that blows Trump's Cruz-JFK aspersions out of the water — and if you watch until the end, he gets an assist from Cruz himself, and Back to the Future. Peter Weber

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