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July 6, 2014

An Arizona elementary school forced a 5-year-old kindergartner who pulled his pants down in the playground to sign a document admitting to "sexual misconduct." Erica Martinez has been fighting to have the sexual offense removed from her son's permanent record. "He's a 5-year-old," Martinez said. "He does not know right from wrong yet." The Week Staff

12:23 a.m. ET
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AL.com is standing by its reporting on Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, and has rejected Moore's claim that the website has turned public opinion against him, with the company's attorney writing, "Any damage to Mr. Moore's reputation was self-inflicted and had already occurred long before AL.com's recent reporting."

Since The Washington Post first published the account of a woman who said when she was 14 years old Moore made sexual advances toward her, AL.com, part of the Alabama Media Group, has done extensive reporting on the matter, interviewing additional women who have accused Moore of sexual misconduct and following up on other stories, like Moore being banned from the Gadsden Mall for bothering teenage girls. Trenton Garmon, an attorney for Moore, his wife Kayla, and their Foundation for Moral Law, sent a letter Nov. 14, to Alabama Media Group, accusing AL.com of making "false reports and/or careless reporting" about subjects related to the Moores.

In response, Alabama Media Group's attorney, John Thompson, sent Garmon a letter Thursday saying the company "rejects" the demand it stop reporting on Moore, writing, "Alabamians — for that matter, all Americans — have a right to know about the individuals who wish to represent them in public office. Like every political candidate, Mr. Moore is subject to scrutiny and analysis by the media and the general public regarding his fitness for public inquiry."

Any lawsuit "would be frivolous and could not be brought in good faith," Thompson said, but if one was filed, "we are confident that litigation would not only demonstrate that AL.com exercised the utmost diligence and employed high journalistic standards in reporting these stories, but would also reveal other important information about your clients." Read Thompson's entire letter at The Washington Post. Catherine Garcia

November 19, 2017
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Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team has requested that the Department of Justice hand over documents related to President Trump's firing of former FBI Director James Comey and Attorney General Jeff Sessions' decision to recuse himself from the investigation of the Trump's campaign and any connections to Russian officials, a person familiar with the matter told ABC News on Sunday.

The special counsel is reportedly looking into whether Trump attempted to obstruct the federal investigation, and the request for documents, delivered within the past month, is the first such request from Mueller's team to the Justice Department. Specifically, ABC News reports, Mueller has asked for communications between DOJ officials and their counterparts at the White House. Catherine Garcia

November 19, 2017
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For two months, surfer Conrad Carr gave up the ocean for land, walking more than 1,000 miles from New York to Florida to help animals affected by hurricanes.

After his friend dared him to walk 1,000 miles, promising to give him $100 for every mile completed, Carr decided to take him up on his offer. Some of his famous friends, including Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth, helped spread the word about Carr's journey, and more donations came in for the cause. "The animals don't have a voice, and I saw the Humane Society was right on the front lines," he told USA Today. "You gotta save all those guys struggling out there."

His journey lasted from September to November, and he's happy to have brought awareness to the plight of animals struggling due to hurricanes. "You feel a lot better when you go out there and do something good for someone who can't," he said. Catherine Garcia

November 19, 2017
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Actor Jeffrey Tambor announced Sunday he will be leaving Amazon's Transparent, after two members of the show's crew said he sexually harassed them.

"Playing Maura Pfefferman on Transparent has been one of the greatest privileges and creative experiences of my life," he told Deadline. "What has become clear over the past weeks, however, is that this is no longer the job I signed up for four years ago." Tambor said he apologizes if any of his actions were ever "misinterpreted by anyone as being aggressive," but called "the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone ... simply and utterly untrue." Because of the "politicized atmosphere that seems to have afflicted our set," he added, "I don't see how I can return to Transparent."

Amazon is investigating the allegations, and prior to Tambor's announcement, there was talk of writing his character out of the show, Deadline reports. Catherine Garcia

November 19, 2017
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A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent died Sunday after he was injured while on duty in Texas, the agency said in a statement.

Rogelio Martinez, a 36-year-old from El Paso, and his partner responded to activity in the Big Bend area when they were injured; a Border Patrol spokesman said he could not disclose what happened to the agents. Martinez died in the hospital, and his partner, whose name has not been released, remains in serious condition. Authorities are searching for suspects and witnesses to the incident, with the FBI taking over the investigation. Martinez became a border agent in August 2013. Catherine Garcia

November 19, 2017

President Trump responded on Twitter Sunday to comments from LaVar Ball, the father of a UCLA basketball player, which downplayed the president's role in getting his son, LiAngelo Ball, and two other student athletes, Cody Riley and Jalen Hill, released from shoplifting charges in China.

"Who?" the elder Ball said to ESPN Friday when asked about Trump's actions. "What was he over there for? Don't tell me nothing. Everybody wants to make it seem like he helped me out." Trump reportedly spoke to Chinese President Xi Jinping about the players while visiting Beijing on his tour of Asia this month, and he did not appreciate Ball's remarks:

In previous tweets this past week, Trump took credit for the athletes' release, wondered if they would thank him, and told them to "HAVE A GREAT LIFE" and be wary of "many pitfalls on the long and winding road of life!" Bonnie Kristian

November 19, 2017

White House budget director Mick Mulvaney addressed the Trump administration's tax reform agenda in a pair of interviews Sunday, depicting a White House willing to do whatever is necessary to change the tax code.

"We're using reconciliation so that we only need 50 votes in the Senate instead of 60," Mulvaney explained on NBC's Meet the Press. "In order to do that, the certain proposals can only have certain economic impact, and one of the ways to game the system is to make things expire," he continued, clarifying that "this is done more to force, to shoehorn the bill into the rules than because we think it's good policy."

Likewise, on CNN's State of the Union, Mulvaney said the White House would endorse removing the ObamaCare individual mandate repeal rider from the tax bill if that is what it takes to pass the legislation. "If we can repeal part of ObamaCare as part of a tax bill and have a tax bill that is still a good tax bill that can pass, that's great," he told host Jake Tapper. But if "it becomes an impediment to getting the best tax bill we can," the repeal amendment will go.

Read the NBC transcript here, and watch Mulvaney's full CNN appearance below. Bonnie Kristian

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