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June 30, 2014

Hello? Is it Lionel Richie or Ritchie you're looking for?

Richie, one of the best-selling musical artists of all time, was honored with a lifetime achievement award during the BET Awards that aired Sunday night. Unfortunately, someone got a little too excited while typing out the captions and added a "t" to his name, which got Twitter all atwitter.

That gaffe didn't take away from his moving acceptance speech. In a message to the up-and-coming musicians in the room, he said: "Soul is a feeling, not a color. Talent is a God-given gift, and not a category. Out-of-the-box is that magical place where talent, true talent, goes to live and thrive and breathe. May you never give that up as long as you're in this business." Watch the speech below. --Catherine Garcia

Terror in Tunisia
7:51 a.m. ET
Brendan Smialowksi/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. officials said Thursday that Tunisia's most wanted jihadist — Seifallah Ben Hassine, also known as Abu Ayadh — was killed in a U.S. airstrike in Libya last month. The strike targeted another al Qaeda leader. Ben Hassine's death, if confirmed, would mark a major success for Tunisia, which has been battling insurgents in its western border region. Last Friday militants massacred 38 people, most of them British, in an attack on a beach resort. Ben Hassine was suspected of masterminding several terrorist attacks and assassinations. Harold Maass

This just in
7:47 a.m. ET

Health insurer Aetna said Friday that it would buy smaller rival Humana for $37 billion in the insurance industry's biggest deal ever. Antitrust regulators will have to review how the acquisition would affect competition. If the deal goes through, the combined company will have about $115 billion and 33 million members, nearly as many as No. 2 carrier Anthem. The deal could be the start of a wave of consolidation that was on hold before last week's Supreme Court ruling upholding ObamaCare subsidies nationwide. Harold Maass

This just in
7:30 a.m. ET
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

In a gambit to shake up the debt crisis talks last Saturday, Greek Prime Minister Alex Tsipras called for a national vote on July 5 to decide whether Greece should accept the terms of its creditors' bailout deal. The move appears to be backfiring.

The dea in question is off the table. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has stopped negotiations until after the referendum. The polls are neck and neck. And a Greek court might decide that the whole thing is unconstitutional anyway.

On Friday, the 50-person court is slated to hear an appeal alleging that the vote violates Article 44 of the Greek constitution, which bars referendums on “the management of fiscal policy and issues that affect the financial situation of the state." The claimants also argue the question posed to voters is too confusing. The Greek government reportedly doesn't intend to offer a rebuttal in court. Nico Lauricella

Discoveries!
5:51 a.m. ET

Pretty cute for 2,000 years old:

Dated to around the first century AD, this marble dolphin turned up on a recent archaeological dig at Kibbutz Magen, Israel, near the Gaza Strip. It's about 16 inches high, munching a fish, and may once have adorned a larger statue of the ancient Roman god Neptune or goddess Venus, both of whom were frequently depicted with sea motifs. Although the archaeologists found it in the ruins of a Byzantine settlement, they believe it to be Roman. For more on the little guy, head over to The Times of Israel. Nico Lauricella

lost and found
July 2, 2015
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The prequel to Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is set to be released on July 14. But controversy about its history — and if Lee, 88, really wants it published at all — has grown thicker already. While the official story holds that Tonja B. Carter, Lee's lawyer, was reviewing an old typescript of To Kill a Mockingbird and happened upon the manuscript for its prequel, Go Set a Watchman, The New York Times has dug up a second, conflicting narrative.

According to the new story, Carter might actually have found the book in 2011, when viewing the contents of Lee's safe-deposit box during a Sotheby's auction house rare books appraisal. In the box, Carter — along with Justin Caldwell, a rare books expert, and Alice Lee, Harper's sister — are said to have discovered a typescript story that looked suspiciously like To Kill a Mockingbird, but clearly wasn't the same.

The other was a typescript of a story that, like Mockingbird, was set in the fictional town of Maycomb and inhabited by the same people. But Mr. Caldwell noticed that the characters were older, and the action set many years later, the person said. After reading about 20 pages and comparing passages to a published copy of Mockingbird for nearly an hour, Mr. Caldwell is said to have realized the differences and told the others in the room that it seemed to be an early version of the novel. [The New York Times]

However, Carter said she had to leave the room and denied she had ever heard of a different manuscript being found that day.

The implications of the second narrative could be hefty, though. While Go Set a Watchman has already rocketed to being the bestselling preorder in the publisher's history, some think that Harper Lee, despite assurances otherwise, might not actually want Mockingbird's prequel published. Adding to the suspicion is the fact that Alice Lee might not have approved of Carter or anyone else publishing the novel. Go Set a Watchman was announced to be released three months after Alice's death. Jeva Lange

medical alert
July 2, 2015
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

U.S. health officials revealed Thursday that a Washington woman's recent death from measles marks the first time someone has died from the disease in the country since 2003. While measles is known to be a highly contagious disease, health officials say it is extremely rare to die from it. Though officials are not saying whether the deceased woman was vaccinated, they did say she that her immune system was compromised due to medications she was taking.

Over the last year, measles cases have soared to an all-time high of 644 since the U.S. was declared to be measles-free in 2000. In Washington state alone, there have been 11 reported cases of measles this year — six of which were in a single county. The spike in measles outbreaks, coupled with this recent death, have further sparked debate over the necessity of the MMR (measles, mumps rubella) vaccine, which some believe — without concrete scientific evidence — causes autism in children. Becca Stanek

Boko Haram
July 2, 2015
Stephane Yas/Getty Images

Boko Haram extremists disrupted a peaceful night of prayer on Wednesday when they gunned down nearly 100 Muslims in mosques in the northeastern Nigerian town of Kukawa. A government official and a self-defense fighter reported that 97 people, most of whom were men, were killed in the Wednesday night incident as they prayed ahead of breaking fast for the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

While it remains unclear exactly how many mosques were attacked, a senior government official told The Associated Press that the attacks affected several of the town's mosques. Spokesmen are also reporting that the militants broke into homes, killing women and children. Boko Haram attacks on mosques are unfortunately not all that uncommon, as the extremist group considers mosque-goers to be too moderate. Becca Stanek

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