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Really?
May 13, 2014
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Karl Rove has found another reason Hillary Clinton is supposedly unfit to be president: a mysterious fall that he thinks may have left her mentally impaired.

Speaking at a conference Monday night, Rove said Clinton, should she run for president in 2016, would need to level with voters about what happened to her after she took a tumble in December 2012, according to the New York Post.

"30 days in the hospital?," Rove said. "And when she reappears, she's wearing glasses that are only for people who have traumatic brain injury? We need to know what's up with that."

Clinton was diagnosed with a blood clot. And as The Washington Times notes, she only spent three days in a hospital — not 30 — though she later returned briefly for more tests.

A rep for Clinton responded: "Please assure Dr. Rove she's 100 percent."

Update: Rove on Tuesday walked back the remark in an appearance on Fox News, saying he never used the term "brain damage," and that he was merely talking about a "serious health episode" that would undoubtedly become an issue when reporters scrutinize Clinton's health history ahead of a White House bid. Clinton "would not be human if this didn't enter in as a consideration," he said, adding, "Look, she'll be 69 by the time of the 2016 election. She will be 77 if she serves two terms, and this ends up being an issue." Jon Terbush

global matters
August 1, 2015
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel will reportedly seek a fourth term in 2017, unnamed sources told German newspaper Der Spiegel. She's expected to officially announce her run in 2016, Politico reports.

Should Merkel win a fourth term, the first female chancellor would find herself right behind the longest-serving leaders in German history, Helmut Köhl and Otto von Bismarck.

There's no obvious successor in place and Merkel is popular in polls, so Politico reports her 2017 candidacy has been anticipated. Julie Kliegman

race in america
August 1, 2015
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The NAACP kicked off a 40-day march through the U.S. South on Saturday meant to highlight issues of racial injustice in the country, Reuters reports. The Journey for Justice organizers started with a civil rights rally in Selma, Alabama, a city key to the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

The march was sparked by the many recent instances of police officers killing unarmed black men, including Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York. 

"We can continue to be serially outraged, or we can engage in an outrageously patriotic demonstration with a commitment to bringing about reform in this country," NAACP President Cornell William Brooks said.

Marchers will conduct teach-ins in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, as they make their way to Washington, D.C., for a final rally Sept. 16. Julie Kliegman

strange species
August 1, 2015

For years, scientists thought Africa's golden jackals to be the same as Eurasian golden jackals. Only one problem: the African ones turned out to not be jackals at all, The Huffington Post reports.

In a new DNA study published Thursday in Current Biology, researchers concluded that what they thought were jackals are actually African golden wolves, the first new species of canine found in Africa in 150 years, according to The Guardian.

Consider the two species distant cousins. Julie Kliegman

Olympics
August 1, 2015

The World Health Organization asked the International Olympic Committee to conduct tests for viruses on the water in Rio de Janeiro, the site of 2016's summer games, The Associated Press reports. The move comes days after an AP investigation found high levels of viruses and bacteria from sewage in the city's water, where open-water swimming and boating events will be held for 1,400 athletes.

The international Sailing Federation will also run independent tests for viruses in the water. One unique feature of Rio playing host to the Olympics is that the boating events are set to be contested unusually close to the rest of the action, offering good publicity to those sports and their athletes. But the venue could change if the waters are deemed unsafe. Julie Kliegman

Science!
August 1, 2015
Johns Hopkins University

Amazon employees aren't the only people aiming to ship things quickly via drone. Doctors are testing out the technology, too.

A study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One reports early findings that it might be possible for doctors to send blood samples to laboratories from remote clinics up to 30 miles away. They ran 56 blood samples from healthy patients through common tests doctors order and found that the drone samples were preserved just as well as the ones that hadn't been airborne, Pacific Standard reports.

The Johns Hopkins University researchers say the next step could be testing the practice in remote regions of Africa. They'll also need to ensure drone flights perform equally well with blood from sick patients. Julie Kliegman

Let's talk about sex
August 1, 2015
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Image

Rite Aid and Food Lion don't want minors in their store learning "25 Ways to Kiss a Naked Man," apparently. That is, you guessed it, a run-of-the-mill Cosmopolitan headline. The pharmacy and grocery chains announced Wednesday they'll shield minors from the horrors of sexual content by putting blinders on the magazine's cover, The New York Times reports.

The blinders will hide the cover's headlines, but not the magazine title or model. So not to worry, your kid can still gaze at barely naked women — he just can't read about them.

The move comes in response to a campaign against Hearst by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, ironically started by William Randolph Hearst's own granddaughter, who does not have an official title at the company.

There's no word yet if other magazine-selling chain stores will follow suit. Meanwhile, the Times points out even racier covers routinely go unguarded. Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition, anyone? Julie Kliegman

Free trade
August 1, 2015
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

The 12 Pacific Rim countries working in Hawaii to establish the biggest free trade deal in history failed to reach an agreement Friday, the end of their latest round of talks. The Trans-Pacific Partnership would cover 40 percent of the global economy.

Negotiators say significant progress was made, according to CNN, but there's no date set yet for the next round of talks. An agreement would lower trade barriers between the nations and encourage economic growth.

President Obama had all but ensured a deal would cruise through Congress, but with the 2016 presidential election on the horizon, if a deal is reached down the road, its fate would be less clear. Julie Kliegman

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