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September 5, 2013

An Arkansas state senator told attendees at a banquet that his job is to serve God, and not his constituents. "There's only one vote that matters, and that's when I stand before the Lord at the judgment seat," said Arkansas state Sen. Jason Rapert. Samantha Rollins

11:32 a.m. ET
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on CNN Sunday he is prepared to call a vote on the bipartisan health-care proposal negotiated by Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) if President Trump is prepared to sign it.

The proposal has the support of all 48 Senate Democrats plus 12 Republicans, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said on NBC Sunday. "This is a good compromise," Schumer argued. "It took months to work out. It has a majority."

The Murray-Alexander bill would appropriate funds for two years of the insurance subsidies Trump recently ended while loosening some ObamaCare rules, including allowing "insurance companies to sell less comprehensive plans to all customers, not just those under age 29 as is the case under current law."

Trump has sent mixed signals about the plan, calling it both "a good start" and "a short-term fix." Bonnie Kristian

10:25 a.m. ET

President Trump returned to familiar stomping grounds on Twitter Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning. He claimed Facebook supported Hillary Clinton during the 2016 election and painted himself as an underdog triumphant:

Later Saturday, Trump turned to the record of his presidency so far, promising tax reform and health-care progress while boasting of mostly unspecified accomplishments on a litany of issues:

On Sunday, Trump reiterated his belief that journalists habitually "FABRICATE STORIES" about him and promoted an interview with himself airing that day. Bonnie Kristian

10:06 a.m. ET
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

Fox News renewed host Bill O'Reilly's contract in January of 2016, promising him $25 million per year for four years, even after he settled a sexual harassment lawsuit for $32 million with the network's knowledge, The New York Times reported Saturday.

While Times reports from earlier this year revealed O'Reilly and Fox together paid around $13 million in the pundit's various harassment settlements, this larger agreement was previously unknown. The settlement was paid over a woman's allegations of "a nonconsensual sexual relationship" and other repeated harassment including the sending of unwanted pornography.

Fox fired O'Reilly in April of 2017. He denies all wrongdoing. Bonnie Kristian

8:12 a.m. ET
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Former President Jimmy Carter would be willing to travel to North Korea for negotiations to avoid nuclear catastrophe, he told The New York Times' Maureen Dowd in an article appearing in the paper's Sunday edition.

"I would go, yes," Carter said, explaining that he, like many, is "afraid, too, of a situation" sparked by the war of words between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. "They want to save their regime. And we greatly overestimate China's influence on North Korea," he continued. "Particularly to Kim Jong Un. He's never, so far as I know, been to China, and they have no relationship."

Carter, 93, said he has offered his services to National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, but the Trump administration has yet to accept. The ex-president previously negotiated in Pyongyang in 1994 and 2010, the first time paving the way for nuclear talks and the second time securing the release of an American prisoner. The North Korean regime enjoys the prestige of a visit from a former world leader. Bonnie Kristian

7:49 a.m. ET

All five living ex-presidents gathered in College Station, Texas, Saturday evening to appear at a concert raising money for the victims of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Republicans George W. and George H.W. Bush and Democrats Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter took the stage together to kick off the event, offering brief remarks praising Americans' unity in the face of adversity.

President Trump sent in a video message. "This wonderful effort reminds us that we truly are one nation under God, all unified by our values and devotion to one another," he said, thanking the former presidents for their contributions to hurricane relief.

Lady Gaga made a surprise showing, appearing alongside Sam Moore, Yolanda Adams, and others. This was the first time all living former presidents have been together since 2013. Bonnie Kristian

October 21, 2017
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The World Health Organization (WHO) came under intense criticism Saturday for its decision to name Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe as the organization's newest goodwill ambassador. The position is mostly symbolic, but the 93-year-old Mugabe, who has ruled Zimbabwe since 1980, is widely considered a dictator, and his government stands accused of gross human rights violations.

"The decision to appoint Robert Mugabe as a WHO goodwill ambassador is deeply disappointing and wrong," said Dr. Jeremy Farrar of Wellcome Trust, a prominent British health charity. "Robert Mugabe fails in every way to represent the values WHO should stand for."

WHO's Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Mugabe was chosen because his government "places universal health coverage and health promotion at the center of its policies to provide health care to all," but outside observers say the Zimbabwean health-care system is in "a shambolic state" with hospitals lacking "the most basic necessities."

Update Oct. 22: WHO rescinded Mugabe's selection as a goodwill ambassador. Bonnie Kristian

October 21, 2017
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President Trump is considering further revisions to refugee admission procedures, Reuters reported Friday evening, including a plan to suspend a program that allows refugees to settle with family members already living in the United States. In the new proposal, incoming refugees would be delayed by additional scrutiny before being admitted to rejoin their families.

Also on the table is increased use of security advisory opinions (SAOs) for refugees coming from high-risk countries. SAOs are in-depth security checks that are currently mandatory for male refugees from some countries; the new plan would apply them to women as well. Refugee fingerprinting requirements may be expanded, too.

The Department of Homeland Security declined a Reuters request for comment as the proposed changes are still under review. Bonnie Kristian

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