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January 23, 2013

Fed up by perpetually squat Subway sandwiches, two New Jersey men — whose lawyer measured subs from 17 locations and found that not one of the fast-food chain's supposed foot-longs measured up — are suing the company. The plaintiffs' lawyer, Stephen DeNittis, says Subway should either make its sandwiches 12 inches long or stop advertising them as such. The filing follows The New York Post's own investigation, which found that four out of seven subs fell short. "They're cheating us," one irate customer told The Post. "They state it's a foot long, so it should be a foot long!" Be a hero, Subway. Lauren Hansen

11:38 p.m. ET

President Trump spoke at the Susan B. Anthony List's annual "Campaign for Life Gala" Tuesday night, and he urged the anti-abortion advocates gathered before him to vote for Republicans in the fall. "Every day between now and November we must work together to elect more lawmakers who share our values, cherish our heritage, and proudly stand for life,” Trump said. But he broke from his script after the teleprompter told him to say that the 2018 midterms were as important as the 2016 presidential election. "I'm not sure I really believe that," he said. "I don't know who the hell wrote that line." The audience laughed.

As Trump's speechwriters and political advisers might say: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Peter Weber

11:21 p.m. ET
David McNew/Getty Images

More than 200 professors at the University of Southern California have called on President C.L. Max Nikias to step down, writing in a letter that he has "lost the moral authority to lead" after it was reported that the campus gynecologist was able to see patients for years, despite complaints.

The professors sent a letter to the USC Board of Trustees on Tuesday, saying Nikias failed to "protect our students, our staff, and our colleagues from repeated and pervasive sexual harassment and misconduct." The Los Angeles Times reported last week that Dr. George Tyndall, the only gynecologist on campus for several decades, was accused of inappropriate behavior, but it wasn't until 2016 when a nurse complained to a rape crisis center that he was removed from the student health center.

An internal university investigation found that his pelvic exams were outside the scope of current medical practice and considered sexual harassment. Tyndall, who denies any wrongdoing, was able to resign and receive a payout, and USC did not report him to the state medical board. USC Provost Michael Quick wrote in a letter on Monday that senior leadership on campus did not learn about the complaints until last year, and "this claim of a coverup is patently false."

An hour after the Board of Trustees received the letter, Chairman John Mork released a statement announcing that the trustees found the report on Tyndall "troubling" but they still "strongly support" Nikias. Nikias has said he understands "the faculty's anger and disappointment," and the university will rewrite its Code of Ethics. Catherine Garcia

10:07 p.m. ET
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Stacey Abrams won Georgia's Democratic gubernatorial primary on Tuesday, defeating former state Rep. Stacey Evans.

Both women are attorneys in the Atlanta area. Abrams is the former Georgia state House minority leader, and is the first female nominee for governor in Georgia from either major party, The Associated Press reports. If she wins in November's general election, she will become the first black female governor in the United States.

On the Republican side, five men are running in the primary, and unless one of them receives more than 50 percent of the vote, there will be a runoff between the top two on July 24. The candidates are Lt. Gov Casey Cagle; Secretary of State Brian Kemp; former state Sen. Hunter Hill; state Sen. Michael Williams; and Clay Tippins. Catherine Garcia

9:42 p.m. ET
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Retired Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath won the Democratic House primary in Kentucky's 6th congressional district on Tuesday, defeating Lexington Mayor Jim Gray.

She will face Republican Rep. Andy Barr in November. Democrats are looking to flip the seat in a district that voted for President Trump by a 16-point margin in 2016. McGrath spent 20 years in the service, retiring from the Marine Corps last June as a lieutenant colonel. Catherine Garcia

9:03 p.m. ET
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

On Tuesday, President Trump announced that before November, he plans on proposing new tax cuts.

The new tax cuts would be revealed ahead of the mid-term elections, as Republicans try to keep their majority. Trump said he would meet with the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), to discuss his proposal, but did not give out any additional details, Reuters reports. Catherine Garcia

8:38 p.m. ET
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The Kilauea volcano continues to erupt on Hawaii's Big Island, and people in its vicinity are being warned not to breathe in the lava haze, or "laze," that results when lava mixes with seawater.

When lava is cooled by seawater, a glass forms. When that glass shatters, tiny shards are picked up by clouds of steam. Those clouds contain hydrochloric acid, which is also formed when lava and seawater mix. Hydrochloric acid can irritate the skin and eyes and make it hard to breathe. While laze "looks innocuous, it's not," Janet Babb, a geologist with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, told The Associated Press.

Masks that are being passed out to local residents can keep out volcanic ash, but cannot filter the hydrochloric acid. Authorities are also warning people to stay far away from where the lava is entering the ocean, as waves can wash over the lava and send scorching hot water onto the shore. So far, the lava has destroyed about 40 homes, and officials have moved 50,000 gallons of flammable gas that had been stored at a geothermal plant near one of the volcano's vents. Catherine Garcia

7:42 p.m. ET
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Mark and Christina Rotondo have a great "worst roommate ever" story to share, except they might want to leave out the part about having raised him.

The Rotondos live in Camillus, New York, and say that they tried for months to get their 30-year-old son, Michael, to move out. They sent him five notes, CBS News reports, with the first one, dated Feb. 2, stern, ordering Michael to "leave this house immediately. You have 14 days to vacate. You will not be allowed to return." On Feb. 13, they busted out the legalese: "You are hereby evicted. You have heretofore been our guest and there is no lease or agreement that gives you any right to stay here without our consent."

When that didn't work, the Rotondos turned to bribery, telling Michael that if he left, they would give him $1,100, and his mother would help him find employment. "There are jobs available even for those with a poor work history like you," the note said. "Get one — you have to work!" He still refused to leave, and the Rotondos took their son to state supreme court. On Tuesday, a judge ordered Michael out. He maintains that his parents did not give him enough time to leave, and called the decision "outrageous." Next time, just change the locks — it's cheaper, faster, and a lot less embarrassing. Catherine Garcia

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