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February 17, 2016
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An estimated 9,110 Chinese villagers will soon be forced from their homes for the sake of finding extraterrestrial life. China's state news agency Xinhua reported Tuesday that the installation of what The New York Times reports to be "the world's biggest radio telescope" in Pingtang and Luodian Counties in the southwestern province of Guizhou necessitates that everyone in a three-mile radius relocate. The telescope, which measures 1,640 feet in diameter, is being installed to detect signs of alien life by reportedly picking up radio signals from "distant corners of the universe," The New York Times reports.

Officials say they will give each dislocated person the equivalent of $1,800 in housing compensation. Construction of the telescope, whose technical name is the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST), is expected to be completed by September. It will cost an estimated $184 million. Becca Stanek

2:56 a.m. ET
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After weeks of speculation, House Speaker Paul Ryan will endorse his party's presumptive presidential nominee, Donald Trump, unidentified senior Trump campaign sources tell ABC News. Ryan is the highest-ranking Republican official, and his endorsement would widely be seen as a sign that the Republican Party is uniting after its divisive primary. The Trump sources did not say when this endorsement would happen, but ABC's Brian McBride noted that Ryan has a press briefing on Wednesday. If Ryan does not endorse Trump then, he will certainly get questions about it. Peter Weber

2:36 a.m. ET
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On Wednesday, the Afghan Taliban confirmed the death of its leader, Mullah Akthar Mansour, killed in a U.S. drone strike, and named his replacement, Mawlawi Haibatullah Akhundzada. The statement was the Taliban's first confirmation of Mansour's death. Akhundzada, a Mansour deputy believed to be 45 to 50 years old, is the former chief of the Taliban courts and is considered more of a religious scholar than military commander; he is responsible for most of the fatwas, or religious edicts, from the Taliban. "Haibatullah Akhundzada has been appointed as the new leader of the Islamic Emirate (Taliban) after a unanimous agreement in the shura," or supreme council, the Taliban said, "and all the members of shura pledged allegiance to him."

Akhundzada was not considered a front-runner to replace Mansour, The New York Times reports, especially since another Mansour deputy, Sarajuddin Haqqani, had been running the day-to-day military operations for the Taliban. But the Taliban leaders meeting in Quetta, Pakistan, apparently wanted a lower-profile consensus candidate, recalling that former Taliban leader Mullah Muhammad Omar's reclusiveness kept him alive for many years. Peter Weber

1:51 a.m. ET

In Albuquerque on Tuesday, Donald Trump held his first campaign rally in almost two weeks, and he used his speech to criticize Hillary Clinton, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), and Gov. Susana Martinez (R-N.M.), the first Latina governor and current head of the Republican Governors Association. "You've got to get your governor to do a better job," he told the crowd of about 8,000. "She's not doing her job." He added, "Hey, maybe I'll run for governor of New Mexico." Martinez has declined to endorse Trump, and she and other state GOP leaders did not attend the rally.

Trump's rally was interrupted several times by protesters, but the real drama was happening outside the convention center.

Protesters outside the venue threw plastic bottles, burning Donald Trump T-shirts, and rocks at the police, and rushed a police barricade, trying to force their way into the Trump rally. The police fired pepper spray and threw smoke grenades into the scrum. Several Albuquerque police officers were injured by flying rocks, the police department said, and at least on person was "arrested from the riot." A glass door was broken, and the police said it appeared to have been hit by a pellet gun.

This was Trump's first visit to New Mexico. It was not the first violent protest outside a Trump rally. Peter Weber

12:44 a.m. ET

Gwen Sefani is a noted fan of Japanese culture. Her boyfriend, Blake Shelton, had never tried Japan's most famous food. Jimmy Fallon stepped in on Tuesday's Tonight Show, taking Shelton out for his first sushi dinner. At Nobu, the famous New York sushi restaurant.

They started with sake — it tasted like "Easter egg coloring," Shelton said — then the salmon. "That, right there, looks like a human tongue," Shelton said. And then he ate it: "The texture is play dough, but I will say this to you right now, man to man, I like that. I like how that tasted." That was the high-water mark. If you have never tried sushi before and are nervous, you can take comfort in Shelton's bravery — and if all else fails, you can repeat his refrain: "Hey, can we get some more rice wine?" Peter Weber

May 24, 2016
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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton won their respective primaries in Washington State on Tuesday, but only Trump gets delegates for his victory. (Democrats allocated their delegates in March caucuses, which Bernie Sanders won.) Trump won at least 27 of the 44 delegates at stake, putting him just 41 delegates shy of clinching the Republican nomination, a formality since he is the only candidate left in the race. Trump and Clinton are expected to wrap up their nominations on June 7, the next and final contest in the 2016 primary season.

With about 70 percent of precincts reporting, Trump has 76 percent of the vote, versus about 10 percent each for Ted Cruz and John Kasich. Clinton is leading Sanders, 54 percent to 46 percent. Peter Weber

May 24, 2016
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The U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday it will pursue capital punishment for Dylann Roof, the white man accused of killing nine black churchgoers during a service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The DOJ released a list of reasons why it will seek the death penalty, including Roof's "lack of remorse" and the fact that the killings were "racially-motivated" and "intentional." Roof faces 33 federal charges from the June 2015 incident, including hate crimes and obstruction of religion. Kimberly Alters

May 24, 2016
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After over a decade of forcing users to get creative within its strict 140-character parameters, Twitter's now-ingrained length limit is getting ever-so-slightly more lenient. On Tuesday, the social network announced that media attachments such as photos and GIFs will no longer count toward the character limit, a game-changer that allows users to incorporate more multimedia into individual tweets without sacrificing precious room for text.

User handles, which are designated by an "@" symbol, will also be exempt from the character count, and tweets beginning with a handle will no longer vanish from users' timelines as they currently do. This relieves the Twitterverse of an odd makeshift trick wherein users place a period before the @ sign in order to make a tweet appear on their main timeline:

In what has surely been a source of stress for Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, the 140-character limit is both what makes the platform unique and an impediment to its growth. Twitter has struggled to attract new users after growth began to level off in 2009, in part because potential newbies are turned off by the difficult prospect of choosing their words carefully to abide by the length limit. Meanwhile, loyal Tweeters have embraced the limit as a necessary cap on the enormous volume of text published on the site — so fervently so that initial reports back in January that Dorsey planned to significantly alter the limit were met with outrage. At the very least, if users find themselves frustrated by even this more minor change, they'll have more room on Twitter to vent their frustrations in GIF form. Roxie Pell

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