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March 5, 2016

A Harvard Law School committee recommended Friday the institution ditch its official seal, which, as The Harvard Crimson reports, includes the crest of a former slave-owning family.

"There are better ways to engage the past and its legacy in the present than by retaining a symbol that so many members of the community reject," the committee's report reads. "We believe that if the Law School is to have an official symbol, it must more closely represent the values of the Law School, which the current shield does not."

In the fall, the seal contributed to a larger discussion about diversity at the school, which also included activists raising awareness of how minorities are treated. Julie Kliegman

10:18 p.m. ET

Canadian Ambassador to Ireland Kevin Vickers famously foiled an attack by a gunman who stormed Parliament Hill in 2014, and on Thursday he tackled a protester who interrupted a ceremony in Dublin.

The invitation-only event commemorated the 100 British soldiers who died during the 1916 Easter Rising, when Irish republicans tried to overthrow British control of the country. The protester, wearing an Easter Rising t-shirt, jumped up and yelled, "This is an insult," CBC News reports. Vickers then grabbed the man, identified by the Irish Republican Prisoners Welfare Association (IRPWA) as a member named Brian Murphy, and lead him away. Murphy was later arrested, and the IRPWA said what Vickers did amounted to "assault."

"We were all kind of surprised, to put it mildly, that a dignitary kind of beat the Irish police in wrestling this guy to the ground," photographer Colin Keegan told CBC Radio's Vanessa Vander Valk. "I have to hand it to him. It was impressive." Before Vickers was appointed ambassador early last year, he was sergeant-at-arms of the House of Commons of Canada, and helped stop gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau as he entered a parliament building while shooting at people. Before he came into the building, Zehaf-Bibeau shot and killed a soldier serving as a ceremonial guard at the Canadian National War Memorial. Catherine Garcia

8:55 p.m. ET

An afternoon thunderstorm caused flash flooding in Horse Cave, Kentucky, Thursday, trapping 19 people inside a cave.

On Thursday morning, students from a Clemson University geology course embarked on a guided tour of the Hidden River Cave, which only has one way in and one way out. They had no cell phone service, and after heavy rains caused water to rush into the cave, two police officers entered to help get the group out; they also became stranded.

The group was caught in an area known as The Attic, The Associated Press reports, which has a higher ceiling, Kentucky State Trooper B.J. Eaton said in a statement. As the water continued to rise, they decided it was time to attempt an escape. "When they came out of the cave, they were neck-deep in water," Hart County Emergency Management Director Kerry McDaniel said. "The waters were continuing to rise under the flash flood. They saw an opportunity to exit the cave, so they took the chance." The students, four tour guides, and two police officers were all checked for hypothermia, and declined additional medical attention. "We looked at this from the beginning and hoped it was a search rather than a recovery operation," McDaniel said. Catherine Garcia

7:47 p.m. ET
Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images

Rapper Troy Ave has been arrested in connection with a shooting at a T.I. concert Wednesday night in New York City that left one man dead and three others, including Troy Ave, injured.

The NYPD released a video it says shows 30-year-old Troy Ave, whose real name is Roland Collins, firing at least one shot inside the green room of Irving Plaza. He is being charged with attempted murder and two counts of criminal possession of a weapon, and could face additional charges, ABC 7 New York reports. The shooting occurred before hip-hop artist T.I. took the stage. Police said first there was a fistfight, which escalated to a gunfight, and they are not sure if another shooter was involved.

The NYPD says Troy Ave shot himself in the leg, and 33-year-old Ronald McPhatter was shot in the stomach and pronounced dead at the hospital. A 26-year-old woman inside the green room was shot in the leg, and a man downstairs in another room was shot in the abdomen when a bullet went through the floor. McPhatter's mother, Rose, said she is "trying to figure out what happened and why," and said her son "jumped in to assist Troy. He was very protective." T.I. was not in the green room at the time, and police say he is not believed to be connected to the shooting. Catherine Garcia

7:02 p.m. ET
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

For the first time in the United States, a person has been diagnosed with a superbug that can't be treated, not even with with a last-ditch antibiotic.

As described in a study published Thursday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a 49-year-old woman went to a military clinic in Pennsylvania with symptoms of a urinary tract infection, and when her sample was sent to a lab, it was determined the E. coli bacteria that caused her infection was resistant to colistin, an antibiotic used as a last resort. Bacteria can become resistant to antibiotics due to overuse of antibiotics in medicine and food production, and in April, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced one in three antibiotic prescriptions is unnecessary. "We risk being in a post-antibiotic world," CDC Director Thomas Frieden told USA Today. "The medicine cabinet is empty for some patients."

Doctors say this woman's diagnosis is noteworthy because she has not traveled outside of the United States. Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) have been working on legislation to make the approval of new antibiotics go faster, and in a statement, Bennet said the news out of Pennsylvania is "terrifying," adding, "we need new drugs to fight these antibiotic-resistant bacteria that pose serious and unique challenges to health care professionals." Catherine Garcia

5:49 p.m. ET
STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images

On Friday, President Obama will become the first American president to visit Hiroshima, one of two Japanese cities against which the U.S. waged nuclear war during World War II. Obama, who entered office in 2009 vowing to scale back global nuclear power, spoke on his nuclear record as commander in chief Thursday during the G7 summit in Asia. He defended his administration's work but acknowledged "we're not where we need to be yet," citing last year's controversial Iran nuclear deal as evidence of progress but conceding the legitimate threat of terrorist organizations obtaining nuclear arms.

"Part of the reason I'm going [to Hiroshima] is because I want to ... underscore the very real risks that are out there and the sense of urgency that we all should have," the president said. In 2009, just months after his first inauguration, Obama won a Nobel Peace Prize for his "extraordinary efforts" toward international peace, and specifically his vision for a "nuclear-free world." Kimberly Alters

4:43 p.m. ET
Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Egypt's state-run news agency announced Thursday that aircraft manufacturer Airbus had detected locator signals from EgyptAir Flight 804, which crashed May 19 in the Mediterranean Sea. While debris from the plane, an Airbus A320, has been recovered in early search operations, the craft's fuselage, flight data, and cockpit recorders have yet to be found.

The pings detected by Airbus are not coming from the plane's black boxes, which record crucial flight information, but instead from "emergency locator transmitters" that are located throughout the aircraft. One such transmitter is usually located in the tail of the aircraft, CNN notes, which is also where flight data recorders are stored; if that transmitter is the one that has been detected, that could lead investigators to recover important flight data as well.

The discovery of the signals also means the massive search area will shrink to just a 3.1-mile radius as officials try to recover the main segment of the plane. The cause of the crash is yet to be determined, though authorities have strongly suggested it was an act of terrorism. Kimberly Alters

3:55 p.m. ET
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

On Thursday, Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant (R) announced his intent to join the lawsuit filed by several states against the Obama administration's transgender bathroom directive, Reuters reports. Officials from 11 states filed a suit Wednesday in Texas against the administration over its stipulation that transgender students be allowed to use bathrooms that correspond to their gender identity rather than biological sex. "Our office has talked to the Texas attorney general's office and I intend, as soon as possible, to join the lawsuit against this latest example of federal overreach," Bryant said in a statement. Mississippi's Democratic attorney general Jim Hood has decided not to participate in the lawsuit, Reuters notes.

The lawsuit, filed in Wichita, Texas, specifically accuses the Obama administration of trying to "turn workplace and educational settings across the country into laboratories for a massive social experiment." The states that have currently signed on to Texas' lawsuit are Oklahoma, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Louisiana, West Virginia, Utah, and Wisconsin, as well as Arizona's Department of Education and Maine's governor. Becca Stanek

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