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March 9, 2016

Depending on the photo you're looking at, Marco Rubio's rally Wednesday in Hialeah, Florida, was either a rousing success or the moment his campaign hit rock bottom.

CNN's Jason Carroll reported live from the event, held at a high school football stadium, and said it was "much, much smaller" than previous Rubio events, with only a "couple hundred" people "not even filling the end zone." To really pour some salt into the wound, CNN's graphics department went with the breaking news caption "Stadium nearly empty for Rubio rally," and the Washington Examiner's Byron York snapped a photo as proof:

Compare that to the people-filled, extreme close-up photos tweeted and retweeted by the Rubio campaign:

Florida, of course, is Rubio's home state, and the senator claims to be confident he's going to win the Republican primary there next week. Catherine Garcia

12:45 a.m. ET

Rodney Smith Jr. is making a difference, one lawn at a time.

Smith, a 28-year-old native of Bermuda, had just earned his master's degree in social work when he spotted an elderly man in Huntsville, Alabama, having a hard time mowing his lawn. Smith stopped to help, and "that night, I decided to mow lawns for the elderly, disabled, single moms, and veterans," he told CNN. His first goal was to mow 40 lawns for free, then bumped it up to 100. He soon started the Raising Men Lawn Care Service, a foundation that finds people who need their lawns mowed and also inspires kids to give back. "This is what I believe my purpose is in life," he said.

Last summer, he set off on a journey across the U.S. and mowed lawns in all 50 states. He's doing it again this year, and has challenged kids to join him by mowing 50 lawns, free of charge, in their hometowns. So far, 12 kids have hit that goal. Smith, who wants to go to every continent next year, also teaches kids about lawn mower safety as he encourages them to engage in community service. "It's about letting them know that no matter how young they are, how old they are, they can make a difference, and it doesn't have to be with a lawnmower," he said. Catherine Garcia

June 20, 2018

On Wednesday, President Trump signed a temporary stopgap measure to keep migrant families detained together — indefinitely, if the courts or Congress do as he requests — but the Health and Human Services Department says it has no plans to reunite the 2,300 children already being detained apart from their parents. The New York Daily News had a message for Trump on Thursday's front page:

Sadly, that may be harder than it sounds. Peter Weber

June 20, 2018
Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Under District of Columbia law, only people of "good character" can hold a liquor license, and a group of religious leaders and former judges argue that the license issued to the Trump International Hotel should be revoked because President Trump "is not a person of good character."

The District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board received a complaint about the hotel from several rabbis, pastors, and retired judges who live in D.C. "The board owes it to the public to investigate the owner's lack of good character now," the complaint said, noting that "good character investigations typically occur at the time of license application or renewal," but Trump has engaged in "egregious conduct."

The complaint asks the alcohol licensing board to focus on Trump's "long history of lies," as well as "his involvement in relevant fraudulent and other activity demonstrating his lack of integrity, and his refusal to abide by the law or to stop associating with known criminals." He's been accused of sexual assault by several women, and fleeced people out of money through Trump University, the complaint continues, and the hotel should be ordered to "show cause why its license should not be revoked." Read the entire complaint here. Catherine Garcia

June 20, 2018

President Trump held yet another campaign rally Wednesday night, this time in Duluth, Minnesota, and most cable news executives apparently found it not newsworthy enough to broadcast live more than two years before Trump can seek re-election. Fox News broadcast the rally, however, and don't you forget it.

In his speech, Trump focused a lot on immigration, only briefly mentioning that he reversed course on separating families at the border, but also attacked the media and FBI, accused Hillary Clinton of committing "numerous" "crimes," and reminisced fondly about the "great meeting" he had with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, saying they "had great chemistry" and predicting Kim "will turn that country into a great successful country."

Trump also touched on the 2020 race. "You know, I hate to bring this up, but we came this close to winning the state of Minnesota," he said. "And in 2 1/2 years, it's going to be really easy, I think." And he pooh-poohed the political and media "elites," kind of. "The elite! Why are they elite?" Trump mused. "I have a much better apartment than they do. I'm smarter than they are. I'm richer than they are. I became president and they didn't." Which, the last part at least, is indisputably true. Peter Weber

June 20, 2018
Steffen Kugler/BPA via Getty Images

While he's in Europe next month, President Trump will meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin, two people with knowledge of the plan told Bloomberg on Wednesday.

The meeting could take place before the NATO summit in Brussels on July 11 or after Trump visits Britain on July 13, one person said. The pair met twice during last summer's G20 summit. Earlier this month at the G7 summit in Canada, Trump appealed to the other members to let Russia back in the group; the country was expelled after Russia annexed Crimea in 2014. Catherine Garcia

June 20, 2018
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With about 45 minutes left until landing, passengers on a Southwest flight from Las Vegas to Baltimore on Sunday suddenly found themselves at a wedding.

Before the plane began its descent, a passenger named Renee, decked out in a white dress, got up and began walking down the plane aisle to meet her groom, Michael, at the front of the cabin. As the other passengers started to realize what was happening, they pulled out their phones and started recording. The wedding was officiated by the pilot, who used an intercom so everyone could hear what was going on.

The pilot announced that the pair met online four years ago, and had Michael promise to take Renee as his "travel companion when I become a Rapid Reward member," which got laughs from the crowd. Here's to a life of smooth sailing and no turbulence for the happy couple. Catherine Garcia

June 20, 2018
Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

It's a quiet ending for a show that created shockwaves throughout its 27 years.

The Jerry Springer Show — which within the past few months aired programs with such titles as "Catfished by a Little Person," "Stop Pimpin My Twin Sister," and "Cold-Hearted Convicts" — has stopped filming new episodes, it was unceremoniously announced this week. Since its debut in September 1991, The Jerry Springer Show has produced 4,000 episodes. The talk show is syndicated, and NBC Universal that the CW and other networks will continue to air reruns.

Producers are dangling a carrot to fans, saying that "there is a possibility" that original episodes could be ordered in the future. While the show is known for its outrageous guests, gratuitous violence, and overall crassness, it's not making as big of an impact in a world dominated by reality TV shows. Springer "was lapped not only by other programs, but by real life," television historian David Bianculli told The Associated Press. Catherine Garcia

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