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April 20, 2017
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A policeman is reportedly dead after a shooter opened fire in a popular Paris tourist area, the Champs-Elysees, The Associated Press reports. The shooter also wounded two other officers before he was reportedly shot and killed by police.

French prosecutors immediately opened a terrorism investigation while French President Francois Hollande said the incident had signs of a "terrorist nature." The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack via its Amaq news agency about two hours after the shooting was first reported; French officials said the suspect was previously known to authorities as an extremist.

A Paris police spokeswoman said the individual had targeted officers and appeared to be acting alone. French police arrested two men earlier this week for allegedly planning a terror attack.

The first round of France's presidential election begins in three days.

This is a breaking news story and has been updated throughout. The Week Staff

1:31 a.m. ET

Republicans may be stuck with Roy Moore as their nominee for a Senate seat in Alabama, but many of them are making the best of it. President Trump has decided not to join other GOP leaders in calling for Moore to quit the race amid credible allegations that he fondled or sexually assaulted teenage girls as young as 14 and pursued sexual relationships with others, and his advisers are coming up with reasons Alabamians might want to vote for Moore over Democrat Doug Jones, a former federal prosecutor. For Kellyanne Conway, that reason was tax cuts; for Trump supporter and former economic adviser Stephen Moore, it was abortion rights.

On CNN Monday night, Moore echoed the White House line that Alabama voters should decide if they want to be represented in the Senate by Roy Moore, who Stephen Moore called "kind of a creep," or Jones, who he said is "no saint, either." Jones, he told CNN's John Berman, "is for partial birth abortion in a state that's highly Christian and Catholic, so there's no moral high ground here between the two candidates." Berman protested, "Except one is an alleged child molester." Moore responded, "Yeah, and the other one is for partial birth abortion, which a lot of people in Alabama think is tantamount to murder."

Alabama is 49 percent evangelical Protestant and 7 percent Catholic, according to Pew, but with Roy Moore's moral stock falling, Republicans are bringing up abortion a lot as a reason not to vote for Jones. Jones told Al.com earlier this month: "I fully support a woman's freedom to choose to what happens to her own body. ... Having said that, the law for decades has been that late-term procedures are generally restricted except in the case of medical necessity. That's what I support." Peter Weber

1:27 a.m. ET

They say "don't mess with Texas," but "don't mess with a mom of 12 who drives a truck with a giant sticker that states 'F—k Trump and f—k you for voting for him'" might be more accurate.

While driving her truck around Fort Bend County, Texas, Karen Fonseca's anti-Trump message caught the eye of Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls. In a Facebook post, Nehls, a Republican, put her on blast, saying he had received complaints about the sticker from "offended" residents, and he wanted to find out who drove the truck so he could discuss "a possible modification of the sticker." He threatened to charge the then-unknown driver with disorderly conduct, but when officers determined the truck belonged to Fonseca and discovered she had an outstanding fraud warrant from 2014, she was arrested.

Fonseca is back on the road, and she's added a second sticker to her window: "F—k Troy Nehls and f—k you for voting for him." During a news conference Monday, she said she is considering filing a civil rights lawsuit against Nehls. "If I can do this, it will encourage others to stand up for their rights as well," she told reporters. "No matter what race, religion, or belief you may have, we are all equal. Not any one of us is any better than anyone else. Everyone's voice should be heard." Fonseca isn't wasting her new-found fame — she's started selling "F—k Trump" stickers and is planning to expand her line to include a "F—k Troy Nehls" collection. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017

On Monday, Atlanta's Georgia Dome went down (mostly) in a cloud of dust and debris from 4,800 pounds of explosives. Lots of people were there to witness the razing of the stadium, including Weather Channel cameraman James Crugnale. It was not his lucky day. "TFW you stream the #GAdome being demolished for 40 minutes and a bus stops in front of the camera at the exact moment it implodes," he wrote on Twitter, with video evidence.

Atlanta's Metropolitan Area Rapid Transit Authority put the missed opportunity in perspective. "Given the potential dangers of bringing down the largest structure of its kind," MARTA's chief marketing and communications director, Goldie Taylor, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "if this is the biggest story, we're really glad about that." On Twitter, Taylor "sincerely apologized" to Crugnale for ruining his shot, but was she really sorry?

If, like Crugnale, you want to see the Georgia Dome implode, you can watch the razing unimpeded at the Journal-Constitution. Peter Weber

November 20, 2017
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In 2015, Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) settled a wrongful dismissal complaint filed by a former employee who said she was fired after refusing to "succumb" to Conyers' "sexual advances," BuzzFeed News reports.

The woman, who asked to remain anonymous because she was afraid of retaliation, said she complained in 2014 to Congress' Office of Compliance, and she ultimately signed a confidentiality agreement in exchange for a settlement of $27,111.75, which came from Conyers' office budget. Conyers admitted no fault as part of the settlement, BuzzFeed News reports. His office did not respond to BuzzFeed News' requests for comment, and the Office of Compliance could not confirm or deny dealing with the woman's case.

BuzzFeed News was given documents related to the case by right-wing Twitter provocateur Mike Cernovich, who claimed he passed them along because if he published them, Democrats would "try to discredit the story by attacking the messenger." BuzzFeed News says it independently confirmed the authenticity of the documents, which included four signed affidavits. The affidavits were from women who used to work for Conyers, who said he asked them for sexual favors and would rub their backs and legs. For more on the allegations and the process of filing sexual harassment complaints in Congress, visit BuzzFeed News. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
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On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick permanently blocked President Trump's executive order to cut funding to so-called sanctuary cities, calling it "unconstitutional on its face."

A sanctuary city limits its cooperation with the federal government in enforcing immigration law, and San Francisco and Santa Clara counties in California sued to block the order. Orrick, who previously put a temporary hold on the executive order, ruled that Trump cannot set new conditions on spending that has already been approved by Congress. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
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From now until New Year's Eve, for 10 minutes every hour, ads calling for the impeachment of President Trump will greet the masses moving through Times Square in the heart of Manhattan.

The digital billboards are paid for by billionaire environmental activist Tom Steyer's political group Need to Impeach. Steyer will spend $20 million on the billboards and television ads, which ask citizens to sign a petition urging elected officials to impeach Trump. "We legitimately feel that this is the huge issue in front of the American people and that no one is standing up for what the overwhelming number of Americans think," Steyer told Bloomberg Politics on Monday.

The billboards went up Monday, and the commercials started airing in October. In the ads, Steyer says Trump is a "clear and present danger" to the United States, helping move the country closer to nuclear war. Catherine Garcia

November 20, 2017
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Acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke announced Monday that roughly 59,000 Haitians living in the United States who have been protected from deportation since 2010 have 18 months to leave the United States.

Haitians who came to the U.S. after a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010 have been safe under a program known as Temporary Protected Status, enacted by Congress in the 1990s to help large groups of undocumented people who fled to the U.S. from natural disasters and wars. More than 30,000 of the affected Haitians live in Florida, and thousands of others live in New York City. Duke is giving the Haitians until July 22, 2019, to leave.

In May, when White House Chief of Staff John Kelly led the Department of Homeland Security, he said conditions in Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere, had improved enough that the U.S. should stop granting Haitians temporary protection. He extended the program for another six months, but warned that those affected should start preparing to return to Haiti, the Los Angeles Times reports. Catherine Garcia

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