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August 13, 2017

"The president is not a representative of the political establishment class, so for whatever reason the people have made a decision that they want to eject him," fired White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci told ABC's George Stephanopoulos in an interview Sunday.

"I think there are elements inside of Washington, also inclusive in the White House, that are not necessarily abetting the president's interests or his agenda," Scaramucci claimed. When Stephanopoulos pressed him to "name names," Scaramucci referred back to his colorful public critiques of ousted White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus.

Scaramucci also weighed in on President Trump's response to this weekend's violence in Charlottesville, which critics have charged did not adequately label and condemn the ideology, associations, and tactics of the white nationalist demonstrators. "I wouldn't have recommended that statement," Scaramucci said of Trump's remarks. "I think he would have needed to have been much harsher," he continued. "With the moral authority of the presidency, you have to call that stuff out."

Watch excerpts of the interview below. Bonnie Kristian

4:19 p.m. ET

After President Trump's shocking press conference alongside Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday, national security experts and lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have sounded the alarm on Trump's apparent choice to believe Putin over America's own intelligence agencies. While acknowledging that Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, among other U.S. security experts, informed him that Russia was responsible for the interference in the 2016 election, Trump sided with Putin, whom he said told him "it's not Russia."

Trump's comments prompted fierce blowback, including a fiery statement from Republican Sen. John McCain (Ariz.), who said — among other jaw-dropping condemnations — that "no prior president has ever abased himself more abjectly before a tyrant." Rep. Will Hurd, a Republican congressman from Texas and former CIA officer, had an explanation for Trump's conduct that was possibly even less flattering: "I never would have thought that the U.S. president would become one of the ones getting played by old KGB hands," Hurd wrote.

Hurd additionally declared that "the president is wrong. Russia interfered in the 2016 election and seeks to undermine our democracy." While Putin disputed Russia's role in the meddling, he did take the occasion of the press conference to remind everyone that he was a highly trained KBG officer before becoming Russia's president. Kimberly Alters

4:08 p.m. ET

Responding to fierce criticism from both sides of the aisle regarding his joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Trump said he hopes we can all just move on from this whole election-meddling thing.

In a Monday tweet, Trump said "we cannot exclusively focus on the past" when it comes to building "a brighter future" in U.S.-Russia relations.

"I have GREAT confidence in MY intelligence people," wrote Trump, pointedly pulling out the one bit of his press conference comments that resembled slight criticism of Russia. When asked whether he believed the intelligence community over Putin's denials of interference, Trump dodged, saying, "I don't see any reason why it would be" Russia that meddled.

Trump's emphasized trust in intelligence officials, who are quite positive that Russia interfered in the election, flew in the face of his own comments. Just moments later, he lauded Putin's "strong and powerful" denial of wrongdoing. Summer Meza

3:36 p.m. ET

Dictionary.com knows how to deliver a subtweet, which it defines as "a hostile or otherwise negative post ... about a particular person but [that] does not mention the person's username."

The website often tweets the meaning of whatever word is taking over the news each day. And in the wake of President Trump's much-derided Monday meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, that word was "traitor."

Dictionary.com didn't name any names, but its replies lit up with users who thought this tweet referred to a particular president. And for those tired of calling Trump's summit with Putin a "disaster," Thesaurus.com offered some alternatives:

The dictionary site's most-visited definitions were also remarkably reflective of the national mood. Trending on Monday were "proliferation" — as in nuclear proliferation — and "collusion" — that thing Trump insists his campaign didn't do with Russia. Kathryn Krawczyk

3:28 p.m. ET

President Trump on Monday directly pitted the advice of Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats against the word of Russian President Vladimir Putin — and appeared to side with the latter. During his joint press conference with the Russian leader following their closed-door summit, Trump said of Russian meddling in the 2016 election: "All I can do is ask the question. People came to me — Dan Coats came to me, and some others — they said they think it's Russia. I have President Putin, he just said it's not Russia. I will say this: I don't see any reason why it would be."

Following Trump's appearance with Putin, Coats released a statement reaffirming the conclusion of the American intelligence community, which is that Russia meddled in the 2016 election. Without mentioning either the American or the Russian president, Coats wrote: "We have been clear in our assessments of Russian meddling in the 2016 election and their ongoing, pervasive efforts to undermine our democracy." He added pointedly: "We will continue to provide unvarnished and objective intelligence in support of our national security."

BBC editor Paul Danahar noted that the fact that Coats would release "a statement that appears to be in repudiation of his boss tells you how unprecedented Trump's comments alongside President Putin today truly were." Read Coats' full statement here. Kimberly Alters

3:04 p.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Conservatives in and out of Washington were alarmed by President Trump's joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday, where the American leader refused to affirm the conclusions of U.S. intelligence agencies that Putin's Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election. Pressed directly by Associated Press reporter Jonathan Lemire as to whether he believes Putin's assertions that Russia is innocent over the findings of American intelligence, Trump dodged the question altogether — and he later lauded Putin's "very strong denials" of meddling and said, "I don't see any reason why it would be" Russia that interfered.

But where some national security experts saw a president who appears to be "wholly in the pocket of Putin," Vice President Mike Pence saw quite the opposite. "What the world saw, what the American people saw, is that President Donald Trump will always put the prosperity and security of America first," Pence said, per NBC News' Peter Alexander.

NBC News' Benjy Sarlin notes that on July 27, 2016 — just days after Pence was introduced as Trump's running mate at the Republican National Convention — Pence struck quite a different tune. "If it is Russia and they are interfering in our elections," Pence said at the time, "I can assure you both parties and the United States government will ensure there are serious consequences." Kimberly Alters

3:04 p.m. ET

Democrats and Republicans alike have united to condemn President Trump's statements at Monday's joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin — but Russian officials couldn't be happier.

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) called Trump's performance "shameful," Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) condemned the president's "naiveté, egotism, false equivalence, and sympathy for autocrats," and former CIA Director John Brennan called the comments "nothing short of treasonous."

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, on the other hand, said the summit was "fabulous ... better than super," Russian media reported. Perhaps Lavrov and failed GOP-hopeful Don Blankenship can start a club — a very, very small club. Summer Meza

2:45 p.m. ET

The conservatives aren't alright. After President Trump met with Russian President Vladimir Putin and held a joint press conference with the Russian leader Monday, conservatives took to Twitter to voice their displeasure.

First up to bat was Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), who quickly condemned Trump's "bizarre" equivalence of the U.S. and Russia's roles in destroying their relationship. "When the president plays these moral equivalence games," Sasse said in a statement, "he gives Putin a propaganda win he desperately needs." Sasse's fellow Republican, Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.), wrote that he thought Trump's performance was "shameful."

Still, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) had perhaps the most savage take of them all:

Away from Capitol Hill, Republican strategist Mike Murphy blasted Trump's "damn near traitorous" remarks, calling the press conference "the most depressing, disgusting, toadying, weak, moronic, [and] lie-stuffed" appearance in the "long history of the American presidency." Former Republican congressman Joe Walsh called the event "the final straw," saying he would "never support Trump again." CNN host S.E. Cupp, meanwhile, rounded things off with a solid dose of sarcasm, which you can see below. Kathryn Krawczyk

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