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October 10, 2017
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Last week, allegations made public in The New York Times accused film mogul Harvey Weinstein of three decades of sexual harassment. On Tuesday, The New Yorker published its own expose on Weinstein's alleged actions, including detailed accounts of rape, assault, and Weinstein's own admission to groping a model in 2015.

Many of the women interviewed by The New Yorker offered eerily similar accounts of Weinstein's alleged abuse: As up-and-coming actresses, the women were uniformly afraid to reject Weinstein's advances for fear of how he might retaliate. Aspiring actress Lucia Evans told The New Yorker that she was lured to a meeting with Weinstein under the assumption that another woman would be sitting in, only to find herself alone with the executive. "At that point, after that, is when he assaulted me," Evans said. "He forced me to perform oral sex on him."

French actress Emma de Caunes also went on record to discuss Weinstein inviting her to his room, only to expose himself to her. "I was very petrified," recalled de Caunes, adding: "It was like a hunter with a wild animal. The fear turns him on."

Italian model Ambra Battilana Gutierrez went to the police to report assault after Weinstein allegedly groped her breasts in a meeting. When Weinstein called asking her to meet him after the incident, police arranged for Gutierrez to attend the rendezvous wearing a wire to get an incriminating statement on tape. The recording, part of which can be heard at The New Yorker, includes Weinstein pressing Gutierrez to join him in his hotel room as Gutierrez clearly protests, saying "I want to leave" and "I don't want to." The case never led to any charges; Gutierrez eventually accepted a payment from Weinstein and signed a restrictive nondisclosure agreement.

In a statement, a spokesperson for Weinstein said: "Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein." Read the full report at The New Yorker. Jeva Lange

12:10 a.m. ET
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A 6.1-magnitude earthquake hit Monday morning north of Osaka, Japan, causing walls to collapse and fires to break out around the city.

Authorities say at least three people were killed — two elderly men and a 9-year-old girl who died at school after a concrete wall collapsed on her — and more than 40 injured. Flights were canceled and train and subway service suspended so officials could look for any possible damage. The Japan Meteorological Agency said the quake struck shortly after 8 a.m. at a depth of about eight miles. Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2018
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Conservative Ivan Duque of the Democratic Center party is the next president of Colombia, after winning 53.9 percent of the vote in a second round runoff election Sunday.

Duque campaigned against the peace deal the government signed with FARC rebels in 2016, which ended 52 years of civil war. He vowed to modify parts of the deal that were controversial, like giving former militants guaranteed seats in congress. His opponent, Gustavo Petro, is the former mayor of Bogota and was once a leftist militant; he supports the peace deal.

When Duque takes office on August 8, shortly after his 42nd birthday, he will become the country's youngest ever president. He worked at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, D.C., before returning to Colombia in 2014 at the insistence of former president Alvaro Uribe to fill a seat in the senate. Critics say Duque is Uribe's puppet. Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2018
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Pixar's Incredibles 2 exceeded all expectations for its opening weekend, bringing in an estimated $180 million in U.S. and Canadian ticket sales and breaking the record for biggest opening for an animated film.

The previous record holder was another Pixar flick, Finding Dory, which opened in 2016 with $135 million. Analysts predicted that Incredibles 2, out 14 years after the original Incredibles, would bring in anywhere from $120 million to $140 million during its opening weekend.

"You don't get to numbers this big without getting everyone, but we were really pleased with all of the demos," Cathleen Taff, Disney's distribution chief, told the Los Angeles Times. "It's a multigenerational crossover event where adults are just as excited to see it themselves as they are to introduce their kids to it." Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2018
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In her first comments on the Trump administration's policy of separating parents from their children at the border, first lady Melania Trump said she "believes we need to be a country that follows all laws, but also a country that governs with heart."

Trump's spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham told CNN on Sunday that the first lady "hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform."

The Trump administration is arresting every adult found crossing the border illegally and charging them with a federal crime, resulting in their children being taken and placed in government custody. People who are following legal procedure and trying to seek asylum are also being arrested at the border and separated from their children. Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2018
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Brooks Koepka on Sunday won the 118th U.S. Open at the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in New York.

Koepka also won the U.S. Open in 2017, his first major title, and is now the seventh golfer to win the national championship in back-to-back years and the first since 1989. The 28-year-old, ranked No. 9 in the world, had a final round 2-under-par 68, beating Tommy Fleetwood by one shot.

"The U.S. Open just takes so much discipline," he said. "You have got to be a great putter and just kind of let things roll off your back. I enjoy the test. I enjoy being pushed to the limit. Sometimes you feel like you are about to break mentally, but that's what I enjoy. I enjoy hard golf courses." Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2018
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When Mexico's Hirving Lozano scored a goal against Germany during World Cup play on Sunday, fans back home were so excited that they made the ground shake, setting off seismic detectors.

Mexican officials said an "artificial quake" reported in Mexico City was likely caused by 
"massive jumps during the goal from the Mexico national soccer team." Lozano scored in the 35th minute of the game, the lone goal of the match. It was a major victory for Mexico, defeating the World Cup's defending champion 1-0. Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2018

Former White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon resurfaced Sunday for an appearance on ABC's This Week to weigh in on, among other things, President Trump's honesty and what's wrong with the pope.

President Trump "has not always told the truth," host Jonathan Karl said while recalling Bannon's time in the White House, but Bannon disagreed. "I don't know that," Bannon replied. “This is another thing to demonize him." Karl pushed back: "You think the president has never lied?"

Bannon said he thinks exactly that. "Not to my knowledge, no," he answered. "Except when he called me Sloppy Steve."

Bannon also addressed the Trump administration's broadly condemned and not legally mandatory policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the border. "It's zero tolerance. I don't think you have to justify it," he said. "We have a crisis on the southern border but the elites in the city ... want to manage situations to bad outcomes. And Donald Trump is not going to do that."

In contrast with his praise for Trump, Bannon, a professing Catholic, slammed Pope Francis for his approach to Europe's refugee crisis and labeled the Catholic Church "one of the worst instigators of this open borders policy." Watch those comments below. Bonnie Kristian

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