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April 12, 2018
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The National Enquirer paid a former doorman of one of President Trump's New York City buildings $30,000 in 2015 for rights to a rumor he'd heard about Trump allegedly fathering an illegitimate child in the 1980s with one of his employees, then killed the story, The Associated Press and The New Yorker report. The doorman, Dino Sajudin, apparently faced a $1 million penalty if he discussed the story with anyone else.

Sajudin went as far as to take a lie-detector test to prove to American Media Inc. — the publisher of the National Enquirer — that high-level employees in the Trump organization had personally told him the rumors. The New Yorker says it could not independently verify that Trump fathered an illegitimate child, and the family of the daughter named in the rumors denied them, or declined to comment. Regardless, "AMI's payment to Sajudin is significant because it establishes the company's pattern of buying and burying stories that could be damaging to Trump during the presidential campaign," The New Yorker writes.

AMI claims Sajudin's story was never published because it couldn't be proven. "I do not believe that story was true," said one of the reporters, Sharon Churcher. "I believed from the beginning it was not true." Another former AMI reporter, Jerry George, wasn't so sure: "AMI doesn't go around cutting checks for $30,000 and then not using the information," he said.

Eight months after Sajudin's contract, the National Enquirer paid $150,000 to a former Playboy playmate who claimed to have had an affair with Trump. Likewise, the publication never ran the story, a tactic known as "catch and kill." Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, also paid adult film actress Stormy Daniels $130,000 before the election to keep quiet about her own claims regarding an affair with Trump. Read the full report about Sajudin's claims at The New Yorker and The Associated Press. Jeva Lange

12:23 a.m. ET

Retired music teacher Robert Moore has long dreamed of getting his students together for one more concert — little did he know that they also had the same idea.

Moore retired in 1996 after spending 30 years directing the Ponca City Chorale in Ponca City, Oklahoma. Moore taught about 900 students, and a small group joined forces to plan a huge concert to show their appreciation. Almost 300 former students were able to gather in Ponca City, coming from different states and countries, to perform for Moore inside the Poncan Theatre. They came up with an elaborate scheme to get Moore to the Poncan, and when he saw all those faces from the past, he was in shock.

Many told Moore they went into teaching and music because of him, including John Atkins from the class of 1976; he spent 25 years singing with the L.A. Opera and other groups, and "it wouldn't have happened with you," he said. Moore taught them discipline and the importance of hard work, several told CBS Sunday Morning, and they respected him. "No man deserves this," he said through tears. "I loved you then and I love you now. Thank you." Catherine Garcia

July 15, 2018
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Wanting to pave the way for negotiations to end the war in Afghanistan, the White House has directed top U.S. diplomats to seek direct talks with the Taliban, several American and Afghan officials told The New York Times.

The Taliban, which controls or has influence over 59 of Afghanistan's 407 districts, has long said it wants to first discuss peace with the United States, not the Afghan government, but the U.S. has always pushed back. There are about 15,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and the Taliban continues to regularly launch deadly attacks.

Over the last few weeks, several high-ranking American officials, including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, have traveled to Afghanistan and Pakistan to prepare for talks, with Pompeo briefly visiting Kabul and meeting with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. Catherine Garcia

July 15, 2018
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Prince William and Prince Charles RSVP'd "no" to tea with President Trump last week at Windsor Castle, leaving Queen Elizabeth to go it alone, The Sunday Times reports.

Both men said they had no desire to meet with Trump during his visit to the U.K., a person with knowledge of the matter told the Times, and even the Queen's interaction with him was "kept to the bare minimum." Trump's trip was not an official state visit, but Prince Charles and Prince William not meeting with him "was a snub," the person said. "They simply refused to attend. It's a very, very unusual thing for the Queen to be there on her own." At 97, Prince Philip has retired from royal duties, with Charles often filling in for his father, but "he goes to what he wants to go to, and if he had wanted to be there he could have been."

Charles and William spent their Friday doing more than changing Prince Louis' diapers and flipping through the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's wedding album; Charles attended a board meeting and a Gloucestershire police event, and William played in a charity polo match. Catherine Garcia

July 15, 2018
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British investigators believe that current or former agents of the Russian military intelligence service G.R.U. were likely behind the nerve attack agent that poisoned an ex-spy and his daughter in Salisbury, England, this spring, The New York Times reports.

On Friday, the Department of Justice indicted 12 G.R.U. officers, accusing them of hacking internal documents from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign. Three current and former U.S. and British officials told the Times that British intelligence is very close to identifying the people they think carried out the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in March, although they have not entirely ruled out another Russian intelligence agency being involved.

Skripal was in the G.R.U. for nearly 15 years, spending some of the time as a spy for M16, Britain's foreign intelligence service. He was arrested in 2004 and pleaded guilty to espionage, but was released in 2010 as part of a spy swap, moving to England. G.R.U. is known for doling out harsh punishment to traitors, but Russia has denied any involvement in the attack. Catherine Garcia

July 15, 2018
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Unfortunately for Elon Musk, all the money in the world can't buy you a thicker skin.

The Tesla and SpaceX CEO lashed out Sunday on Twitter at a British diver who criticized him for sending a mini-submarine to the cave in Thailand where 12 boys and their soccer coach were trapped for more than a week. Vern Unsworth played a major role in the rescue, and told CNN on Saturday the mini-submarine was "just a PR stunt" with "absolutely no chance" of working.

In now-deleted tweets, Musk said he "never saw this British expat guy," and there was video of the rescue that proved Unsworth wrong. Musk followed up by saying, "You know what, don't bother showing the video. We will make one of the mini-sub/pod going all the way to Cave 5 no problemo. Sorry pedo guy, you really did ask for it." Unsworth has not yet responded to Musk's attack. Catherine Garcia

July 15, 2018

President Trump claimed on Twitter Sunday he will be subject to criticism by Democrats and the media no matter how positive a result he secures at his Monday summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Trump also alleged the press has not given adequate attention to North Korea's decision not to conduct new weapons tests for the better part of a year. "[W]hy isn't the Fake News talking about these wonderful facts?" he asked. "Because it is FAKE NEWS!" Alternatively, maybe it is because it is customary to report more on things that do happen than things that don't. Bonnie Kristian

July 15, 2018

France won the 2018 World Cup Sunday, triumphing over Croatia 4-2 in a dramatic, hard-fought match.

The first goal went to France when Croatia scored the first-ever own goal in a World Cup final. Croatia leveled the score half an hour in, only to see France score three more goals in succession.

French player Kylian Mbappe, 19, became the youngest player to score in a World Cup final game since the legendary Pele's two goals scored for Brazil against Sweden at age 17 in 1958.

Croatia came back from the dead with another goal at 69 minutes, bringing the score to 4-2, but proved unable to close that gap before game's end.

Belgium took third place Saturday, and England came in fourth. Qatar hosts the next World Cup in 2022. Bonnie Kristian

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