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June 18, 2018

President Trump has repeatedly tried to pass off his administration's new "zero tolerance" policy of separating immigrant children from their parents at the border on Democrats, even as other administration officials have doubled down on the practice. Here are some of the contradictory excuses offered by the Trump team for a policy that is being increasingly criticized by Democrats and Republicans alike. Jeva Lange

President Trump: "It is the Democrats' fault for being weak and ineffective with Boarder Security and Crime. Tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by Crime coming from illegal immigration. Change the laws!"

Attorney General Jeff Sessions: "I would cite you to the Apostle Paul and his clear and wise command in Romans 13, to obey the laws of the government because God has ordained them for the purpose of order. Orderly and lawful processes are good in themselves and protect the weak and lawful."

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders: "I can say that it is very biblical to enforce the law. That is actually repeated a number of times throughout the Bible."

Senior policy adviser Stephen Miller: "It was a simple decision by the administration to have a zero tolerance policy for illegal entry, period. The message is that no one is exempt from immigration law."

Legislative affairs chief Marc Short: "The policy is incredibly complicated and it is one we need to do a better job of communicating."

Former chief strategist Stephen Bannon: "We ran on a policy — very simply — stop mass illegal immigration and limit legal immigration, get our sovereignty back to help our workers, and so he went to a zero tolerance policy. It's a crime to come across illegally and children get separated. I mean, I hate to say it, that's the law and he's enforcing the law."

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen: "We do not have a policy of separating families at the border. Period."

12:12 a.m. ET

It took awhile to get right, but now, Dooma Wendschuh's beer brewed from cannabis no longer tastes like "rotten broccoli."

Wendschuh is an entrepreneur who moved to Ontario, Canada, from Miami in 2016, and is developing what he says is the world's first beer brewed from cannabis. He started Province Brands in order to ride the pot wave; on October 17, Canada will legalize marijuana for recreational use, with edibles expected to follow next year. Most cannabis beer on the market was brewed from barley and infused with marijuana oil, he told The Guardian, but "that's not what we do. Our beer is brewed from the stalks, stem, and roots of the cannabis plant."

To get the beer to lose its broccoli taste, Wendschuh hired a chemist, and he has since come up with a concoction using hops, water, yeast, and cannabis, which yields a non-alcoholic, gluten-free beer that gets you high. "The flavor is dry, savory, less sweet than a typical beer flavor," he told The Guardian. "The beer hits you very quickly, which is not common for a marijuana edible." This beer is also environmentally friendly, since roots, stocks, and stems are typically tossed. "We take them off the grower's hands, saving them the cost of hiring a licensed disposal company to dispose of them," Wendschuh said. Catherine Garcia

July 22, 2018
George Frey/Getty Images

One person was killed and another injured Sunday afternoon during a shooting inside a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints chapel in Fallon, Nevada, about 63 miles east of Reno.

KTVN-TV reports that the suspect, John K. O'Connor, 48, is in custody, and the person who was injured sustained a non-life-threatening gunshot wound to the leg. A spokesperson for the LDS Church told CBS News, "We express our love to those in this congregation and our prayers for the victims and their families. Local leaders are ministering to them at this time."

KTVN says at least 50 people were inside the church during the shooting, and O'Connor left and went back to his home, where he was arrested. Police said the motive is not yet known. Catherine Garcia

July 22, 2018
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In 2015, accused Russian agent Maria Butina met with senior officials at the U.S. Treasury Department and Federal Reserve while working as an interpreter for Alexander Torshin, then the Russian Central Bank's deputy governor, Reuters reports.

Torshin and Butina had one meeting with Nathan Sheets, then Treasury undersecretary for international affairs, and another with Stanley Fischer, then Fed vice chairman, with both arranged by the Center for the National Interest. The pro-Russia foreign policy think tank put together a report regarding its Russia-related activities from 2013 to 2015, Reuters reports, and said the meetings helped bring together "leading figures from the financial institutions of the United States and Russia."

Butina, 29, pleaded not guilty last week to charges she acted as a foreign agent for Russia. Fischer told Reuters he did meet with Torshin, who has close ties to Putin, and his interpreter, but couldn't remember much beyond that they discussed "the state of the Russian economy." Catherine Garcia

July 22, 2018
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Mondelez Global, the manufacturer of Ritz Crackers products, has announced a voluntary recall of some varieties, due to concerns over salmonella.

Mondelez said the supplier of whey powder for its crackers recalled the ingredient because of the possible presence of the bacteria. The recall affects Ritz Bits Cheese, Ritz Cheese Cracker Sandwiches, Ritz Bacon Cracker Sandwiches with Cheese, Ritz Whole Wheat Cracker Sandwiches with White Cheddar Cheese, Ritz Everything Cracker Sandwiches with Cream Cheese, and Mixed Cookie, with expiration dates from Jan. 14, 2019 to April 13, 2019.

Salmonella can make young children, elderly people, and those with weakened immune systems seriously ill. Mondelez said that so far, they have not received any complaints from consumers about salmonella, and the recall is out of an abundance of caution. Catherine Garcia

July 22, 2018
Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

On Sunday, a suicide bombing near Kabul's international airport left at least 14 dead and 40 injured.

Police said the blast happened near an airport entrance where supporters of exiled Afghan Vice President Rashid Dostum were waiting to see him drive by in his motorcade. Dostum was back in Afghanistan after more than a year in Turkey, and was in an armored vehicle when the bombing took place; he was not hurt. The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the bombing, which killed at least one child and several members of Afghan security forces.

Dostum has been accused of human rights abuses stretching back to 2001, and last year, his guards allegedly seized political rival Ahmed Eshchi and tortured him; Dostum denies the allegations. Catherine Garcia

July 22, 2018
CBS News/Screenshot

"This morning the president is again accusing the Justice Department and the FBI of misleading courts and illegally surveilling his campaign," CBS host Margaret Brennan said to Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Face the Nation Sunday, referring to President Trump's angry response to the Carter Page surveillance documents. "Is he wrong?"

"No," Graham replied, breaking with his Senate GOP colleague, Florida's Marco Rubio. Graham then called for scrutiny of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, also known as the FISA court, which approved the spying on Page.

"I think that the whole FISA award process needs to be looked at," he said. "The warrant on Carter Page was supported mostly by the dossier that came from [Christopher] Steele, who [was] being paid by the Democratic Party to do opposition research; and the dossier was collected, I think, from Russian intelligence services; and if you ask the FBI today how much of the dossier on Trump has been verified, [it's] almost none of it."

The extent to which the warrants were based on the dossier is subject to debate along predictably partisan lines. Less predictable is Graham's sudden discovery within himself of suspicion of the FISA court: Before Trump took office, the senator was a stalwart opponent of limits on the court's power, repeatedly voting to permit warrantless surveillance and prevent reform. In 2015, he claimed "anybody who neuters" the FISA court's "roving wiretap" program "is going to be partially responsible for the next [terrorist] attack." Bonnie Kristian

July 22, 2018

President Trump claims the FBI spied on and undermined his presidential campaign in 2016 for partisan purposes. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) does not.

Responding to Saturday's publication of the FBI's application to surveil former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page in connection to Russian election interference, Rubio said on CNN Sunday he "has a different view on it."

The feds "knew who [Page] was even before the campaign," Rubio explained on State of the Union. "I don't believe that them looking into Carter Page means they were spying on the campaign," he continued. "I also don't think it proves anything about collusion. ... I don't think it's part of any broader plot. The only plot here is the plot to interfere in our election by the Russians."

Also contra Trump, Rubio argued the FBI did not do "anything wrong" in its application to spy on Page: "I think they went to the court. They got the judges to approve it. They laid out all the information ― and there was a lot of reasons ... for why they wanted to look at Carter Page."

Rubio also addressed Trump's recent meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, as well as Trump's plan for a second summit with Putin this fall. Watch the whole interview below. Bonnie Kristian

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