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10 things you need to know today: August 5, 2015

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Harold Maass
Rick Perry didn't make the cut.
Rick Perry didn't make the cut. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
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1.

Fox News reveals line-up of first prime-time GOP debate

Fox News on Tuesday announced which 10 Republican presidential candidates would be included in the first prime-time debate of the 2016 campaign, which takes place Thursday. The top-polling candidates made the cut. They were Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Scott Walker, Mike Huckabee, Ben Carson, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Rand Paul, Chris Christie, and John Kasich. The rest of the pack — including Rick Perry, Rick Santorum, Bobby Jindal, Carly Fiorina, Lindsey Graham, George Pataki, and Jim Gilmore — will participate in a separate, earlier debate. [CNN]

2.

FBI examines security of Hillary Clinton's email system

The FBI is investigating the security of Hillary Clinton's private email server, The Washington Post reported Tuesday. Agents also have asked Clinton's lawyer, David Kendall, about the security of a thumb drive he has that holds copies of messages Clinton sent while serving as President Obama's secretary of state. The inspector general for intelligence agencies referred the issue of Clinton's use of a private email account to the Justice Department in July to determine whether sensitive material could have been compromised. [The Washington Post]

3.

Netflix offers employees a year of paid parental leave

Netflix announced Tuesday that it will give employees who are new parents up to a year of paid time off. The policy will be one of the most generous parental leave offerings in the tech industry. "Netflix's continued success hinges on us competing for and keeping the most talented individuals in their field," said Tawni Cranz, chief talent officer for the popular video streaming service. [Los Angeles Times]

4.

Sandra Bland relatives file wrongful death suit

Sandra Bland's family on Tuesday filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Texas state trooper who arrested her in a tense July 10 traffic stop and the county jail where she was found in her cell days later. A Waller County coroner ruled that Bland, a 28-year-old African American woman, had committed suicide by strangling herself with a trash bag, but her family says she would not have killed herself in jail. "What remains constant is that she should not have been there in the first place," her sister, Sharon Cooper, said. [The Washington Post]

5.

Obama launches push to win congressional support for Iran nuclear deal

President Obama is framing the looming congressional vote on the Iran nuclear deal as the most important foreign policy decision since the authorization of the Iraq war. Obama is trying to head off critics with a Wednesday speech at American University in which he plans to say that those who backed the now-unpopular decision to invade Iraq now oppose the Iran deal. The speech comes as Obama launches a campaign to build support in Congress for the diplomatic deal. [The Associated Press, The New York Times]

6.

Double train derailment kills 24 in India

At least 24 people were killed Tuesday when two passenger trains derailed in central India as they crossed a flooded bridge. The Kamayani Express was crossing the bridge over the rain-swollen Machak River headed for Mumbai, and the Janata Express was traveling in the opposite direction shortly after a flash-flood hit, washing away base material supporting the tracks. More than 300 people were rescued after the two trains came to rest nearly side by side. [The Associated Press, The Indian Express]

7.

Jeb Bush backtracks after remark suggesting U.S. might spend too much on women's health

GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush was forced to play defense Tuesday after saying in an interview that the federal government might have overfunded women's health care. "I'm not sure we need half a billion dollars for women's health issues," the former Florida governor said while answering a question about defunding Planned Parenthood. Democrat Hillary Clinton's campaign tweeted that Bush was "absolutely, unequivocally wrong." Bush promptly said he had misspoken. [The New York Times]

8.

Doctor's lawyer says he was not in Zimbabwe on date of alleged illegal hunt

Dr. Jan Seski, the second American recently accused of illegally killing a lion in Zimbabwe, was not in the African nation in April when the alleged hunt occurred, a lawyer for the Pittsburgh-area oncologist said Tuesday. Attorney Greg Linsin said Seski did participate in a "lawfully permitted hunt" in July, the same month when Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer was accused of killing a protected lion named Cecil. Zimbabwe's government is seeking Palmer's extradition. [CNN]

9.

New York moves to counter deadly Legionnaires' disease outbreak

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio mandated citywide inspections of water-cooling towers after an historic outbreak of Legionnaires' disease was traced to bacteria in five South Bronx towers. De Blasio also vowed to propose regulations to prevent future outbreaks. Since July 10, 86 people have fallen ill with Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia that is contracted by breathing infected air. Seven of those stricken have died. [Reuters]

10.

Champion free diver missing after recreational dive

Natalia Molchanova, who is widely considered to be the world's greatest free diver, is missing and feared dead after failing to resurface from a recreational dive in about 115 feet of water near the Spanish island of Ibiza. Molchanova's son, Alexey, said Tuesday that after two days of intensive searching, he did not expect her to be found alive. Underwater robots have scanned a 500-mile radius. Molchanova, 53, is a 23-time world free-diving champion, and holds 41 world records. [The New York Times]