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10 things you need to know today: August 10, 2015

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Harold Maass
Protesters mark the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown's death.
(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
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1.

Shooting follows peaceful protests on Michael Brown anniversary 

A day of peaceful protests on the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown's death ended in a burst of gunfire late Sunday, when police shot and critically injured a young man they said had opened fire on them. The man was in surgery early Monday. Friends identified the injured man as Tyrone Harris, 18. Harris' father said he was "real close" with Brown, an unarmed black teen who was killed by a white cop in Ferguson, Missouri, last year. Four plainclothes officers involved in the Sunday incident were placed on administrative leave pending an investigation. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch, CNN]

2.

Hillary Clinton to propose $350 billion affordable college plan

Hillary Clinton plans on Monday to unveil a $350 billion, 10-year plan to make college more affordable and accessible for millions of Americans. Dubbed the New College Compact, the proposal calls for an incentive program that will give more money to states that agree to offer "no loan" tuition at community colleges and four-year public universities; states that enroll more low- and middle-income students; and states that work with colleges to reduce living expenses for students. [The Washington Post]

3.

U.S. sends military jets and personnel to Turkish base

The U.S. sent six F-16 fighter jets and 300 personnel to a Turkish air base on Sunday, weeks after Turkey agreed to let the U.S. use its territory to launch bombing attacks against Islamic State forces in Syria. Turkey had resisted stepping up its involvement in the battle against the Islamist militants, but relented as Syrian violence threatened to spill over the border. Turkey was hit by a wave of attacks Monday. In one, four police officers were killed. In another, two gunmen fired shots outside the U.S. Consulate, but nobody was injured. [Reuters, BBC News]

4.

Trump leads another poll

Donald Trump continued to lead the rest of the Republican presidential field in a poll of GOP primary voters released Sunday, despite widespread criticism for comments he made about women and Fox News moderator Megyn Kelly during and after last week's debate. Trump topped the survey with the support of 23 percent of respondents. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) was next with 13 percent. The NBC News Online Poll by SurveyMonkey was conducted over 24 hours starting Friday evening. [NBC News, Bloomberg]

5.

Iraqi leader, facing protests, launches anti-corruption effort 

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi on Sunday announced drastic anti-corruption measures as weeks of protests against poor government services tested his authority. Abadi said via Facebook and Twitter that his government would reopen graft cases under the supervision of a high-level commission, and eliminate sectarian quotas in the selection of ministers, among other measures. "We are starting today genuine reform in all areas," Abadi said in a statement. [The Washington Post]

6.

Families end private search for Florida teens lost at sea

The families of Florida teens Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen said Sunday they had ended a private search for the boys, who went missing during a fishing trip on July 24. The Coast Guard suspended its search on July 31, but the families and volunteers kept looking from Jupiter, Florida, to South Carolina, fueled by nearly half a million dollars in donations. The families said in a joint statement that they lacked clues to guide them further, and thanked all who helped.  [The Palm Beach Post]

7.

Haiti holds parliamentary elections after four-year delay

Haitians voted Sunday in parliamentary elections after a wait that dragged on for nearly four years due to a power struggle between President Michel Martelly and the opposition. The first round of balloting to fill two-thirds of the 30-member Senate and the whole 99-member lower house was viewed as a critical test of the election system leading up to a presidential vote in October. Sunday's voting was disrupted in some polling stations by delays, and sporadic violence. [The Associated Press]

8.

South Korea vows "harsh price" for North Korean land mines

South Korean Maj. Gen. Koo Hong-mo said Monday that North Korea would "pay a harsh price" for planting land mines on the southern side of the DMZ. Last Tuesday, two South Korean soldiers were badly injured when they stepped on land mines while patrolling the South Korean side of the demilitarized zone, which has separated North and South Korea since the Korean War ended in an armistice in 1953. Seoul and the United Nations accuse North Korea of planting the mines recently. [CNN, Reuters]

9.

Hiker believed killed by grizzly bear in Yellowstone

An experienced hiker missing since Friday appeared to have been killed by a grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park, park officials said Sunday. A park ranger found the victim, who was not immediately identified, near the Elephant Back Loop Trail in a "popular off-trail area he was known to frequent," the statement said. He had defensive wounds on his arms, and had been partially consumed. The hiker was from Montana, and worked for a contractor that operates urgent care facilities in the park. [The Washington Post]

10.

NFL legend Frank Gifford dies at 84

Pro Football Hall of Famer Frank Gifford died Sunday a week short of his 85th birthday. Gifford was an All-American at USC, and was drafted in the first round of the pro draft in 1952. He played 12 seasons for the New York Giants. The sometimes halfback, sometimes receiver, sometimes defensive back earned all-pro honors four times. After retiring as a player, he remained an NFL icon as a member of the Monday Night Football commentary team for more than 25 years. [USA Today]