Feature

Apple rejected what could have been the best iPhone game ever

Behold: The psychotic bliss that is Send Me to Heaven

Perhaps you have spent the last few months squinting into your phone's screen, swiping at colorful dots or candy shapes with your fingertips to varying degrees of frustration. And while games like Dots and Candy Crush Saga are perfectly fine time-wasters in their own right, both lack the imaginative and addictive thrill of Send Me to Heaven, which could have gone down as one of the best iPhone games of all time…if only Apple hadn't rejected it.

Its premise is simple. You throw your phone in the air as high as you can. Your phone's gyroscopes and doo-dads calculate how high you threw it, and record your score on SMTH's leader boards. (The current top score is 40 meters, apparently.)

Then, hopefully you catch it. That's it.

Apparently, the App Store's gatekeepers thought this was a bad idea, and didn't want a bunch of Apple's butter-fingered customers smashing their iPhones to bits, as is their prerogative.

Android users, on the other hand, can still download the game at the Google Play store, where it currently has a respectable ranking of 4 1/2 stars.*

As for helpful hints? SMTH's creators got you covered (emphasis added):

Be careful not to injure yourself or others. Be always aware that there is enough space above you and around you. Do some training to learn right skills to get best results. Switch on GPS on your phone and allow the App to use location to be able to take part in local competition. [Google Play]

Good to know! And in case you're wondering: No, a PC version does not appear to be imminent.

*The Week, of course, endorses that you catch your phone should you throw it in the air, and is not liable for any damages that may be incurred from playing this insane game.

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