Seven-year-old finds $1,400, and more

Gregory Payne III was cleaning up his grandmother’s backyard when he noticed a pile of folders on the side of a highway that abuts her yard.

Seven-year-old finds $1,400

Seven-year-old Gregory Payne III was cleaning up his grandmother’s backyard in Richmond, Ind., when he noticed a pile of folders on the side of a highway that abuts her yard. He investigated and discovered they contained several documents, along with $1,400 in cash, all belonging to the nonprofit Achieva Resources, which assists disabled children. He alerted his grandmother and the money was returned. “I would have loved to have kept it,” he said, “but I wanted to do the right thing.” The charity said the folders had been stolen from a safe. “The first thing I thought,” said Achieva CEO Dan Stewart, “was for a 7-year-old boy to be that honest was amazing.”

Hunter kills mother seal, delivers seal pup

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After a subsistence hunter on remote Nelson Island in the Bering Sea discovered that a seal he’d just killed was pregnant with a nearly full-term pup, he successfully delivered it. The hunter’s daughter promptly called an animal-rescue center, hundreds of miles away near Anchorage, and the pup was flown there by volunteers last week. Staff at the facility named the baby seal Maxwell. “We hope to give Maxwell a second chance at life as a wild harbor seal,” said Brett Long, the center’s husbandry director.

Hiker buried in avalanche calls 911 on cell phone

A hiker who was trapped in an avalanche on Washington state’s Granite Mountain was rescued after he was able to phone for help from beneath the snow. Ian Rogers was buried for about four hours, crammed into a tiny space with a small hole leading to the surface, allowing him to breath. He frantically called 911 on his cell phone, and the call went through. Sheriff’s deputies said they used the location of the tower that picked up Rogers’ signal, along with the information he’d provided the dispatcher, to track him down. He was not seriously hurt. “I was extremely lucky,” Rogers said.

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