Feature

Top Serbian suspect turns himself in

The week's news at a glance.

Belgrade

Top war-crimes suspect Milan Milutinovic flew voluntarily to The Hague this week to face charges that he helped plan the 1999 ethnic cleansing in Kosovo. As president of Serbia, Milutinovic had enjoyed immunity from prosecution until last month, when his five-year term expired. Zoran Djindjic, the Serbian prime minister who has pledged greater cooperation with the tribunal, said last year that Milutinovic would definitely be in The Hague by January. “The only question is whether it will be the hard way or voluntarily,” he said. Milutinovic claims that in 1999 he was just a figurehead and that Slobodan Milosevic, the federal Yugoslav president, held all the power. He says he had no idea that Serbian police were rampaging across Kosovo, raping and murdering ethnic Albanians.

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