Feature

Farewell to double-decker buses

The week's news at a glance.

London

The city of London has decided to phase out the red double-decker buses that are so picturesque but so expensive to operate. As the old Routemasters retire, they will be replaced by extra-long “bendy buses” that have an accordion-style hinge in the center. The Routemasters have a conductor who wanders the coach taking tickets, but the new buses will have only a driver. Passengers will have to purchase tickets ahead of time from machines. Many Londoners decried the change as the sacrifice of a national symbol on the altar of cost-cutting. “If it is to snake its way into our affection,” The Times said in an editorial, “the new bus, at the very least, must be painted red.”

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