The Day Shall Come and the myth of the black nationalist terrorist

How Christopher Morris' new film hauntingly illustrates existential black American terror

The Day Shall Come.
(Image credit: Screenshot/IFC Films)

Whatever your race, culture, creed, or calling, it makes no odds to Christopher Morris: To him, all mankind is equally absurd.

Almost equally absurd, anyway. Morris, a veteran director, writer, actor, and comedian, parlayed his black satirical sensibilities into filmmaking in 2009 with his feature debut, Four Lions, a movie that orbits a quartet of wannabe jihadis cooking up terror plots in Sheffield; Morris presents them as either constitutionally dimwitted or morally torn, but beneath the derision lies an acknowledgement that they're just pawns of fundamentalist casuistry. He doesn't excuse their violence, but he does understand its source.

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