The real warning in Labour's crushing defeat

Neither left-wing populism nor centrist technocracy is sufficient to defeat right-wing populism. What is needed is a "one-nation" liberalism.

Jeremy Corbyn.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Christopher Furlong/Getty Images, Library of Congress, Aerial3/iStock)

Boris Johnson's historic victory on Thursday was his own. He purged the party of die-hard Remain heel-diggers, set the agenda of "get Brexit done," and won, tearing the heartland out of the Labour coalition and earning the largest Tory majority since 1987.

But Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn's loss was also his own. Labour's 202 seats in the newly elected parliament will mark the weakest representation for the party since 1935. Labour hemorrhaged support, shedding over 2.5 million voters and 7.8 percentage points of the popular vote — and those voters fled in all directions, some staying home, some going to the Tories, and some going to the Liberal Democrats, who though they lost seats increased their share of the popular vote by over 4 percentage points.

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