Hungary might be a bellwether for the future of authoritarian populism

Viktor Orban.
(Image credit: Omar Marques/Getty Images)

"For the first time in years," there's "real evidence" that authoritarian populism may be on the decline globally, Yascha Mounk writes in The Atlantic.

Mounk cites multiple countries around the world in which both right-wing and left-wing populist parties and leaders are either facing a backlash after in years in power or have seen their rise in popularity slow significantly. Hungary might be the "most interesting case," according to Mounk, and the central European nation's parliamentary election next year could provide a glimpse into what the future of the global authoritarian populist movement will look like.

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