Archaeologists crack the code on a 4,000-year-old clay disk

Archaeologists crack the code on a 4,000-year-old clay disk
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For more than 100 years, archaeologists have been baffled by the markings on the clay "Phaistos disk," which dates to roughly 1,700 B.C.E. Now, researchers have figured out what some of the disk's words could mean.

The disk, which is roughly six inches in diameter, was found in the Phaistos palace in Crete in 1908 and has symbols on both sides, written in a spiral pattern. The disk includes 241 picture segments from 45 individual symbols, Discovery News reports.

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Meghan DeMaria

Meghan DeMaria is a staff writer at TheWeek.com. She has previously worked for USA Today and Marie Claire.