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March 28, 2014
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A Mississippi news anchor is under fire for posting inflammatory remarks on his personal Facebook page about the amount of coverage LGBT issues have been receiving lately. WLOX-TV anchor Dave Elliot said that while he's all for the LGBT community's "ongoing fight for equality," they have been in the news "too much" lately. "Maybe they should take a short break. Go on a gaycation... just for the weekend," he suggested.

The comment, which was first spotted by Jim Romensko's media blog, drew ire from his bosses at the Biloxi-based ABC/CBS affiliate. On Facebook, the station said they weren't happy to receive this type of "free publicity" for Elliott's remarks and said they're committed to covering issues concerning the gay community. Elliott apologized soon after for his "insensitive and unprofessional" post.

"I've advocated for justice and equality for my entire life," he said. Jordan Valinsky

6:51 p.m. ET

In an interview with The New York Times, Arrested Development's Jessica Walter said that she has to "let go of being angry" at her co-star, Jeffrey Tambor, publicly commenting for the first time on an on-set incident where Tambor blew up at her.

Tambor mentioned the incident during an earlier interview with The Hollywood Reporter, after he was fired from Transparent over allegations of sexual misconduct (he denies the accusations). In tears, Walter said that "in almost 60 years of working, I've never had anybody yell at me like that on a set and it's hard to deal with, but I'm over it now. I just let it go right here, for The New York Times." She noted that after he "verbally harassed" her, Tambor apologized.

Co-stars Jason Bateman, David Cross, and Tony Hale tried to defend Tambor, with Bateman telling the Times that a lot of performers are "difficult" and Cross saying it's "important" for people to know Tambor "learned from the experience and he's listening and learning and growing." Hale said that everyone has "had moments," but Walter spoke up, saying, "but not like that, not like that. That was bad." Co-star Alia Shawkat supported Walter, saying that just because someone is "difficult" it "doesn't mean it's acceptable. And the point is that things are changing, and people need to respect each other differently." Arrested Development's fifth season debuts on Netflix May 29. Read the entire interview at The New York Times. Catherine Garcia

5:32 p.m. ET
Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images For NYFW: The Shows

Federal prosecutors in Manhattan are investigating allegations of sexual assault against former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

The investigation is "in an advanced stage," a Manhattan DA representative said. The probe is looking into allegations of sexual abuse made by actresses Paz de la Huerta and Lucia Evans. Prosecutors are examining claims that Weinstein "lured or induced any women to travel across state lines for the purpose of committing a sex crime."

Weinstein has denied ever engaging in nonconsensual sex acts. The movie mogul has been accused of wide-ranging abuse by more than 50 women. The allegations range from sexual harassment to rape, and many women in the entertainment industry say they felt coerced or manipulated by him.

Weinstein's attorney has met with prosecutors "in an attempt to dissuade them from proceeding," reports NBC News. New York Police Department officials are reportedly ready to arrest Weinstein if they receive approval from Manhattan DA Cy Vance. Read more at The Wall Street Journal. Summer Meza

4:59 p.m. ET
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Rudy Giuliani's ironclad legal strategy strikes again.

Giuliani, President Trump's lawyer, told The Washington Post on Wednesday that he is now recommending that Trump sit for an interview with Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

"I guess I'd rather do the interview. It gets it over with it, it makes my client happy," said Giuliani. “The safe course you hear every lawyer say is don't do the interview, and that's easy to say in the abstract. That's much harder when you have a client who is the president of the United States and wants to be interviewed."

Giuliani has flip-flopped when it comes to whether or not Trump should grant an interview to Mueller, who is leading the investigation into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russian interference during the 2016 election. On Tuesday, Giuliani said that "the answer would have to be no," but apparently the president's view on the matter has changed several times as well.

Trump agrees with attorneys who advise him against an interview, said Giuliani, then "he goes right back to, 'why shouldn't I?'" Giuliani told the Post that Trump was frustrated but optimistic: "His tweeting has been effective" in discrediting the investigation, said Giuliani. "He feels the public opinion is turning in his favor."

Even though Trump is apparently unconcerned, Giuliani worried that investigators would accuse him of committing perjury in an interview. "They may have a different version of the truth than we do," he said. Read more at The Washington Post. Summer Meza

4:13 p.m. ET
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President Trump on Wednesday said that the U.S. should revoke aid to any country that allows immigrants to come to America. During a roundtable meeting about immigration loopholes and gang violence, Trump offered what he claimed would be a simple solution.

"We're going to work out something where every time somebody comes in from a certain country, we're going to deduct a rather large amount of money from what we give them in aid," said Trump to cheers, "if we give them aid at all."

Trump said that many countries encourage citizens who commit crimes or are involved in gangs to go to the U.S. "They'll let you think they're trying to stop this — they're not trying to stop it," he said. "They don't want the people that we're getting in that country."

The president additionally doubled down on a statement from his last roundtable meeting on immigration. Trump was criticized for calling immigrants involved in gang violence "animals," but he repeated himself on Wednesday. "I called them animals the other day and I was met with rebuke," said Trump. "They said, 'They're people.' They're not people. These are animals." Summer Meza

2:32 p.m. ET
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After a year-long background check, President Trump's son-in-law and adviser, Jared Kushner, has at last been granted permanent security clearance, a White House insider told The New York Times on Wednesday. Kushner was among a number of administration officials who had his temporary highest-level security clearance downgraded earlier this year.

The White House official who spoke about Kushner's status claimed that the long process was not unusual for someone "who has a complicated financial history and many foreign contacts," as the Times writes. And while Kushner is reportedly being investigated by Special Counsel Robert Mueller — CNN reports he sat for a seven-hour interview with investigators in April — that probe apparently did not play a part in his clearance status.

Kushner notably had some difficulty filling out his disclosure forms, serially leaving off contacts and meetings, such as one with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower in June 2016. Jeva Lange

1:57 p.m. ET
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The NFL Players Association is not happy with the NFL's new "respect for the flag" policy.

On Wednesday, NFL owners approved a new rule that will require any football player on the field to stand and "show respect" during the national anthem before each game. Players have the option of staying in the locker room until after the ceremony, but if they don't stand while on the field, they will face a fine. Many NFL players have opted to sit or kneel during the anthem as a way to protest police brutality and racial injustice in the U.S., drawing criticism from people who say it's an inappropriate way to make a point.

"The NFL chose to not consult the union in the development of this new 'policy,'" read the statement from the Players Association, the organization representing NFL athletes. "NFL players have shown their patriotism through their social activism, their community service, in support of our military and law enforcement, and yes, through their protests to raise awareness about the issues they care about."

The union went on to say that the new rule ran in opposition to what NFL executives had previously told players. "Our union will review the new 'policy' and challenge any aspect of it that is inconsistent with the collective bargaining agreement," the statement concluded. Summer Meza

1:12 p.m. ET

A federal district court judge in New York has ruled it's unconstitutional for President Trump to block users on Twitter. The president's Twitter feed was ruled to be a "public forum," and by blocking users, he is in violation of the First Amendment.

Part of the decision came down to the fact that when Trump blocks a user, they are no longer able to reply to his tweets, Reuters reports. "Once it is a public forum, you can't shut somebody up because you don't like what they're saying," argued U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald earlier this year.

The ruling could potentially have even broader implications:

Buchwald ultimately ruled that "the viewpoint-based exclusion of the individual plaintiffs from that designated public forum is proscribed by the First Amendment and cannot be justified by the president's personal First Amendment interests." The lawsuit was filed by the Knight First Amendment Institute and Columbia University and a handful of Twitter users. Read the full decision here. Jeva Lange

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