Coffee counteracts liver cancer risks from drinking alcohol, study finds

Study: Caffeine affects boys and girls differently, starting at puberty
(Image credit: iStock)

Liver cancer is the second-deadliest type of cancer worldwide, and the London-based World Cancer Research Fund has a new report out examining what factors appear to contribute to liver cancer, and what helps people survive it. On the contributing-factor side, the WCRF study found that three or more alcoholic drinks a day increases the risk of liver cancer — the same conclusion as in the body's last look at liver cancer in 2007.

In new findings, though, the WCRF discovered "strong evidence that drinking coffee is linked to a decreased risk of liver cancer," for reasons that aren't yet clear. "Both coffee and coffee extracts have also been shown to reduce the expression of genes involved in inflammation, and the effects appear to be most pronounced in the liver," the researchers suggest. This evidence comes largely from animal studies, "although some human studies contribute to the evidence," the study adds.

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