The military is preparing to bring missing American soldiers' remains home from North Korea

The burial of U.S. Army Sgt. Joseph Snock, who died while in a prisoner of war camp after being wounded in battle in late November or early December in 1950 in North Korea.
(Image credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The military said Saturday it is delivering more than 200 caskets to the North Korean village of Panmunjom, close to the South Korean border, in preparation for the return of the remains of U.S. soldiers missing since the Korean War in the 1950s.

The return was part of the agreement reached by President Trump at his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore. About as many soldiers' remains were returned between 1999 and 2005.

Trump has celebrated the return of the "hero remains" and, implausibly, claimed the soldiers' parents begged him to make this happen. Most parents of American soldiers old enough to have fought in Korea would be well over 100 years old were they still alive today.

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