August 30, 2014

Saturday cartoons are very, very, very important to one 10-year-old Chinese boy.

A worker was installing lighting on the outside of a high-rise apartment building when a boy appeared at an eighth-floor window and began sawing through the worker's safety rope. Apparently, the construction racket was drowning out the kid's cartoons, and he decided this would be an effective way to restore some silence.

"I shouted at him to stop, but he didn't listen and soon after, the rope was broken," the worker told Chinese new outlet Xinhua. "That's when I called to my workmate for help."

Forty minutes later, several firemen rescued the worker from his precarious position. Police questioned the boy, who eventually admitted to his actions. The kid's dad came home and apologized to the worker.

He also gave him a new safety rope. Sarah Eberspacher

3:33 p.m. ET
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The FBI announced Friday that it would be renewing its investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server after learning of "the existence of emails that appear to be pertinent to the investigation," as FBI Director James Comey wrote in a letter to Congress. Those new emails were apparently discovered in the FBI seizure of "electronic devices belonging to Huma Abedin and her husband, Anthony Weiner," The New York Times reports.

Abedin and Weiner separated earlier this year after renewed reports of Weiner sexting other women. "The FBI and the New York Police Department have opened preliminary investigations of allegations that the former New York Democratic congressman exchanged sexually explicit text messages with a purportedly underage girl," CNN reported in September.

In July, the FBI recommended no criminal charges after looking into if Clinton or her aides had mishandled classified information. Comey did, however, say at the time that Clinton was "extremely careless" with her private email server.

Jeva Lange

3:03 p.m. ET

The Observer has obtained the contents of a 2006 audio tape that appears to reveal then-Sen. Hillary Clinton suggesting the U.S. should have rigged the Palestinian election. "I do not think we should have pushed for an election in the Palestinian territories. I think that was a big mistake," Clinton is heard telling the editorial board of The Jewish Press about the Jan. 25, 2006 election for the second Palestinian Legislative Council, in which Hamas won a victory over the U.S.-preferred Fatah. "And if we were going to push for an election," Clinton went on, "then we should have made sure that we did something to determine who was going to win."

The original tape belongs to Eli Chomsky, a former editor and staff writer for The Jewish Press, who claims to have the only copy in existence. Chomsky told The Observer, which is published by Donald Trump's son-in-law, that at the time he was surprised "anyone could support the idea — offered by a national political leader, no less — that the U.S. should be in the business of fixing foreign elections."

The news went unpublished at the time, Chomsky explained, because "The Jewish Press had this mindset that they would not want to say anything offensive about anybody … My bosses didn't think it was newsworthy at the time. I was convinced that it was and I held onto it all these years."

The tape is 45 minutes long, and contains "much that is no longer relevant," The Observer writes. You can listen below, or read more about it at The Observer. Jeva Lange

2:42 p.m. ET

After FBI Director James Comey announced that the bureau would be renewing its look into Hillary Clinton's private email server, liberals reacted with both shock and concern over an election that many had already been celebrating as a victory.

You might guess how the news has gone over with Donald Trump. Jeva Lange

2:22 p.m. ET

On Friday, the FBI announced it would be doing a further review of emails potentially related to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server. Clinton was on a plane en route to Iowa when the news broke, which led to frenzied anticipation of the Democratic nominee's response to the news.

After spending almost half an hour still inside the plane when it finally did land, Clinton emerged at last — and was greeted by this:

And you thought landing at LaGuardia was bad. Kimberly Alters

1:58 p.m. ET

Russia has lost its seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council, having been ousted by a vote Friday among the 193 member countries of the United Nations. Russia had been a member of the UNHCR since its creation in 2006.

Membership to the 47-member council is appropriated geographically, and Russia was competing with Hungary and Croatia for two available seats allotted to Eastern Europe. In the elections Friday, Russia received only 112 votes, while Hungary and Croatia received 144 votes and 114, respectively. Russia has been widely criticized for human rights violations, particularly with its treatment of LGBT individuals and its support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Also Friday, Saudi Arabia — another nation with a spotty human rights record, as New York Times United Nations reporter Somini Sengupta notes — won one of the seats available for Asia. Egypt, Iraq, China, and the United States were also elected to the council. Kimberly Alters

1:56 p.m. ET

Donald Trump praised the FBI's decision to reopen its investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server, calling it "brave" and a chance for the bureau to "right the horrible mistake that they have made."

"We must not let her take her criminal scheme into the Oval Office," Trump declared to his audience in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Trump joked, "With that being said, the rest of my speech is going to be so boring. Should I even make the rest of my speech?" But he continued to return to the topic, saying, "I think [the FBI is] going to right the ship, folks, I think they're going to right the ship." He then declared: "This is bigger than Watergate."

Trump claimed he had only been told the news 10 minutes before taking the stage. Clinton, meanwhile, was on a plane en route to Iowa "with no wi-fi for the last two hours," Politico reports, when the news broke. Jeva Lange

1:41 p.m. ET

Stocks screeched downward on Friday after the FBI announced it would be investigating new emails linked to Hillary Clinton's use of a private server while serving as secretary of state. "Stocks turned negative after the report of the new probe. Many analysts have said that markets were pricing in a Clinton victory in November," NBC News reported.

The Mexican peso also dropped by 0.6 percent, with analysts previously having used its strength to argue for a likely Clinton win, Business Insider reports. Jeva Lange

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