Conflict in Gaza
August 5, 2014
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That's according to The Wall Street Journal and NBC:

Opinion about the Middle East also split sharply along gender lines, with men expressing more strongly pro-Israel views than women, who were more inclined to an even-handed approach. In sizing up Israel's military action in Gaza, 54 percent of men believed it was justified, compared with only 34 percent of women. Asked about U.S. policy more generally, 58 percent of women — compared with 48 percent of men — favored an approach that treats Israel and the Palestinians equally. [The Wall Street Journal]

About 1,800 Palestinians have been killed thus far in Operation Protective Edge, many of them women and children. A cease-fire is currently in effect. Ryu Spaeth

The Daily Showdown
4:27 a.m. ET

On Monday night's Daily Show, Jon Stewart gave one cheer for the bipartisan Medicare payment reform Congress passed last week, a mere 18 years after creating the problem in the first place. Oh good, he quipped, "you decided to fix it once your procrastination could legally vote." The bipartisan effort was a nice change, but the over-the-top back-patting was a little too much for Stewart. The result? Some pretty good mockery.

When President Obama offered to throw lawmakers a party for doing their job, Stewart jabbed: "They don't need a trophy for showing up — they're Congress, not millennials." He followed that up by borrowing a phrase from George W. Bush (and speechwriter Michael Gerson): "Talk about the soft bigotry of low expectations." Seriously, he added, "imagine if normal people reacted this way to the dutiful executing of basic occupation tasks." And the segment ends with just that, a look at how such self-congratulatory zeal might look in a New York deli. Watch. —Peter Weber

You Forgot About Me
3:33 a.m. ET

Staff of Maine Township High School District 207, in a northwest suburb of Chicago, were moving to a building next door when they made an unexpected discovery:

"One day a few weeks ago, one of the assistants was going through a filing cabinet and found a file that had a manuscript from The Breakfast Club dated Sept. 21, 1983," District 207 Superintendent Ken Wallace tells the Chicago Tribune. "It's a first draft of the screenplay by John Hughes." He said the plan is preserve and display the piece of cinematic history, noting that "the odds of having such an iconic movie filmed and associated with your district are astronomical."

As to how Maine South High School came to have an original first draft, that's no mystery: Much of the iconic film was shot during the spring of 1984 inside Maine North High School, closed in 1981. The movie's library set was built inside the North Maine gym. Scribbled on the manuscript is "Reviewed and approved by Dr. Murphy," referring to then-Superintendent John Murphy; school district officials typically looked over scripts before allowing movies to be filmed on school property.

Among changes between the script and the final movie: The original name was "Saturday Breakfast Club," and Molly Ringwald's character had a different name. Read more about the discovery, just in time for the film's 30th anniversary, at the Chicago Tribune. Peter Weber

Going to Pot
2:50 a.m. ET

Monday, April 20, was the unofficial national day of marijuana appreciation (or something), for reasons you might already know if you are a recreational marijuana user. If you are, and are still feeling the effects of 4/20 — or are perfectly sober and like Sgt. Pepper-era Beatles, for example — Late Late Show bandleader Reggie Watts has a psychedelic treat for you. Host James Corden asked Watts to perform an original ode to national pot day, and this is what he (and his effects pedals) came up with. (The mellow vibe gets a little harsh near the end.) —Peter Weber

have mercy
2:30 a.m. ET

It's happening: The Full House revival Fuller House will air on Netflix in 2016.

John Stamos broke the news Monday night on Jimmy Kimmel Live, saying the project was a long time in the making. "It's a labor of love," he said. "We've been trying for so many years to do it right, and I think we've finally got it perfect."

Netflix inked a deal for 13 episodes, with the show following basically the same storyline as Full House: D.J. Tanner-Fuller (Candace Cameron Bure) is a recently widowed and pregnant veterinarian (because it wasn't enough for her mother to die in the original show? How much tragedy can the Tanners take?). Stephanie Tanner (Jodie Sweetin) is now the female Uncle Jesse, an aspiring musician who moves in to help D.J. take care of her sons, 12-year-old J.D. and 7-year-old Max. And, because the house just isn't quite full enough, D.J.'s childhood BFF Kimmy Gibbler (Andrea Barber) will help her friend out in her time of need, just like Joey did for Danny all those years ago. The only difference is, she has a teenage daughter accompanying her, and they won't be forced to live in an alcove for several episodes.

While Stamos will definitely reprise his role as Uncle Jesse, Netflix says it's still discussing guest appearances with other original cast members Bob Saget, Mary-Kate Olsen, Ashley Olsen, Dave Coulier, and Lori Loughlin. Watch the video below to hear Stamos deliver the good news. —Catherine Garcia

Dirty Deeds Not Done Cheap
1:54 a.m. ET
Joel Ford/Getty Images

Phil Rudd, longtime drummer for the rock bank AC/DC, has unexpectedly changed his plea to guilty on a charge that he threatened to kill a former employee he had fired after a solo album failed to sell well, a court in Tauranga, New Zealand, said Tuesday. Rudd also pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana and methamphetamine.

According to court documents, Rudd called an associate in September and said he wanted one of the fired employees "taken out," then later offered that same associate about $150,000 plus "a motorbike, one of his cars, or a house," apparently to carry out the earlier request. Rudd also allegedly called the unidentified ex-employee and threatened to "come over and kill you," which frightened the worker, BBC News reports. A second murder-for-hire charge was dropped due to lack of evidence.

Rudd's lawyer, Craig Tuck, downplayed the seriousness of the charge, saying it "essentially revolved around an angry phone call — that was it." But it could land Rudd in prison for up to seven years, plus nine months for the drug charges. He is free on bail until a hearing in June. Peter Weber

the power of poo
1:49 a.m. ET
Facebook.com/DetroitZoo

The Detroit Zoo is looking to turn 400 tons of animal waste generated every year into thousands of dollars in savings.

The Detroit Zoological Society and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation have launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise enough money to build a biodigester, ABC News reports. The biodigester would turn all of that manure and other organic waste into methane-rich gas that could help power the Ruth Roby Glancy Animal Health Complex, saving the zoo between $70,000 to $80,000 annually.

The biodigester would also convert manure into compost to fertilize habitats, gardens, and public areas. If $55,000 is raised through the campaign, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and crowdfunding platform Patronicity will give a $55,000 matching grant, meaning there will be plenty of waste-generated power to go around. Catherine Garcia

time to say goodbye
1:08 a.m. ET
Rick Kern/Getty Images

During Monday's Daily Show, Jon Stewart announced that the Aug. 6 broadcast will be his last.

Stewart waited until the end of the episode to make his announcement, and while he didn't give any details about what will happen on that final show, he did remind viewers that there is a contest underway to give a fan the opportunity to attend his last taping, Variety reports. Stewart did not say when new host Trevor Noah's first show will air. Catherine Garcia

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